P. V Addyman, ed., (1979). Biological evidence from the Roman warehouses in Coney Street. York: Council for British Archaeology.

Title
Title
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Title:
Biological evidence from the Roman warehouses in Coney Street
Series
Series
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Series:
The Archaeology of York
Volume
Volume
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Volume:
1414/2 (2)
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DOI
DOI
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DOI
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Monograph Chapter (in Series)
Author
Author
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Author:
Harry Kenward
Dorian Williams
Editor
Editor
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Editor:
Peter V Addyman
Publisher
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Publisher:
York Archaeological Trust
Council for British Archaeology
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
1979
ISBN
ISBN
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ISBN:
0 900312 87 4
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Date Of Issue From: 1979 Editorial Expansion: The Archaeology of York Vol 14 fasc 2
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Source:
British Archaeological Abstracts (BAA)
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URL: http://www.iadb.co.uk/pubs/pubs.php
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Created Date:
05 Dec 2008
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Abstract
45 - 100
SE 602517. Biological and pedological evidence from layers underlying and associated with two phases of Roman riverside store buildings has proved to be of great significance in the understanding of the site. Immense numbers of grain beetles together with a few seeds of arable weeds represented the remains of spoiled grain; this layer had been sealed by a thick layer of silt before a new store building was erected. This second building was associated with quantities of mixed charred grain. With contributions by J.R.A. Greig and J.S.R. Hood