Cross, M., Lawson, J. A. and Cook, M., (2013). Marlin's Wynd: new archaeological and documentary research on Post-medieval settlement below the Tron Kirk, Edinburgh.. York: Archaeology Data Service. https://doi.org/10.9750/issn.1773-3808.2013.55.

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Marlin's Wynd: new archaeological and documentary research on Post-medieval settlement below the Tron Kirk, Edinburgh.
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Scottish Archaeological Internet Reports
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
55
Pages
Pages
The number of pages in the publication or report
Number of Pages:
44
Downloads
Downloads
Any files associated with the publication or report that can be downloaded from the ADS
Downloads:
sair55.pdf (1 MB) : Download
DOI
DOI
The DOI (digital object identifier) for the publication or report.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.9750/issn.1773-3808.2013.55
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Monograph Chapter (in Series)
Abstract
Abstract
The abstract describing the content of the publication or report
Abstract:
The 17th-century Tron Kirk, on the High Street, Edinburgh, is built over the remains of tenement buildings that were pulled down to allow its construction. The re-development of the building provided an opportunity to complete the earlier excavations carried out between 1974 and 1983 and a more complete footprint of the tenements emerged, together with a fragment of the old High Street. The archaeological investigation has been complemented by documentary research which has populated the tenements with colourful occupants as far back as the late 15th century. The artefact assemblages from both the recent and earlier excavations contain only material of 16th- and 17th century date, which suggests that the tenements had been redeveloped during the late 15th/early 16th centuries, thus removing all but a trace of the earlier medieval settlement.
Author
Author
The authors of this publication or report
Author:
Morag Cross
John A Lawson
Martin Cook
Issue Editor
Issue Editor
The editor of the volume or issue
Issue Editor:
Helen Bleck
Publisher
Publisher
The publisher of the publication or report
Publisher:
Society of Antiquaries of Scotland
Historic Scotland
Archaeology Data Service
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2013
Locations
Locations
Any locations covered by the publication or report. This is not the place the book or report was published.
Locations:
Location - Auto Detected: Tron Kirk
Location - Auto Detected: Edinburgh
Location - Auto Detected: High Street
Locations
Locations
Any locations covered by the publication or report. This is not the place the book or report was published.
Subjects / Periods:
Temporal - Auto Detected: Post-medieval
Temporal - Auto Detected: medieval
Subject - Auto Detected: settlement
Source
Source
Where the record has come from or which dataset it was orginally included in.
Source:
DigitalBorn
Related resources
Related resources
Other resources which are relevant to this publication or report
Relations:
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
14 Aug 2014
Chapter Title Sort Order Both Arrows Access Type Author / Editor Page
Start/End Sort Order Up Arrow
Abstract
1
The 17th-century Tron Kirk, on the High Street, Edinburgh, is built over the remains of tenement buildings that were pulled down to allow its construction. The re-development of the building provided an opportunity to complete the earlier excavations carried out between 1974 and 1983 and a more complete footprint of the tenements emerged, together with a fragment of the old High Street. The archaeological investigation has been complemented by documentary research which has populated the tenements with colourful occupants as far back as the late 15th century. The artefact assemblages from both the recent and earlier excavations contain only material of 16th-and 17th century date, which suggests that the tenements had been redeveloped during the late 15th/early 16th centuries, thus removing all but a trace of the earlier medieval settlement.
2 - 3
A description of the site location and a brief summary of earlier work.
4
A brief history of the construction of the Tron Kirk.
Morag Cross
4 - 11
This chapter discusses the origins of the name 'Marlin's Wynd' and the background to the construction of the Tron Kirk with an account of the wynds, closes and associated tenements which were demolished to make way for it.
12 - 16
Excavation in 2005 revealed fragments of four main buildings (A, B, C, D), two sections of road (Marlin's Wynd and the High Street), a courtyard and an area of post-medieval industrial activity.
Nicholas M McQ Holmes
George R Haggarty
John A Lawson
17 - 26
This chapter contains edited reports on coins and pottery. Reports on building material, animal bone, metal artefacts and a piece of leather are contained in the archive. Eight coins were recovered and all are described as examples of the small change that would have circulated in Scotland in the 1630s. The pottery supports the idea that the site had been significantly redeveloped during the 15th and early 16th century with newly constructed tenements removing most of the earlier urban deposits. The analysis was a rare and important opportunity in Scotland to examine a tightly dated group of local and imported pottery with a terminus post quem of 1637.
George R Haggarty
John A Lawson
Hugh Willmott
27 - 31
In addition to the pottery there are brief sections on clay pipe and tile, window glass and vessel glass.
32 - 33
Documentary evidence records that at least four tenements were compulsorily purchased. Building work for the Tron Kirk would have destroyed these. It has been possible to identify some of the owners of these tenements and some of the functions to which the buildings were put. Documentary and archaeological evidence are drawn together to form a narrative of sorts for each building.
34
The huge expansion and development of Scottish medieval and post-medieval archaeology since the publication of the first excavation results has facilitated the contextualisation of the evidence.
35
36 - 38