n.a., (1977). Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland 109. Edinburgh: Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.

Title
Title
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Title:
Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland 109
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Series:
Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland
Volume
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Volume:
109
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Publication Type:
Journal
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Society of Antiquaries of Scotland
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Year of Publication:
1977
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Date Of Issue From: 1980
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05 Dec 2008
Article Title Sort Order Both Arrows Access Type Author / Editor Page
Start/End Sort Order Up Arrow
Abstract
Leslie Alcock
1 - 6
An excavator's skills cannot be assessed from even a full excavation report: the primary aim of archaeological publication is to make information available, not to encourage the impossible task of 'site reconstruction'. Moreover very few readers have the time or need to grapple with complex detail, even if they can afford the high costs of such reports. Hence conventional methods of publication in the 'Cranborne Chase manner' should be abandoned in favour of depositing a comprehensive primary report to publishable standard in an archive, with copies available in microform on demand. Only a distillation of this report would be printed in book or journal form.
Caroline R Wickham-Jones
G H H Collins
7 - 21
Lists known occurrences in Scotland from published Geological Survey and other sources, and emphasizes the influence of raw material quality on the finished product.
Kevin J Edwards
22 - 29
Graeme Whittington
30 - 35
Dorothy N Marshall
36 - 74
NS 002843. Two Neo phases included traces of two small round houses and some hearths, together with greenstone axes, flint knives, arrowheads and scrapers, and pottery of Grimston style (discussion by J G Scott). Succeeding phases were represented by a semi-circular cairn and cist, and an isolated cist and hearth, all of BA; an oblong timber-built house (Late Iron Age?); an iron bloomery and a hearth radiocarbon dated to the 7th century AD; a rectangular stone-built house; and four ?medieval stone-built circular and rectilinear houses. A R
Dorothy N Marshall
36 - 74
J N Graham Ritchie
John Crawford
75 - 103
John W Barber
104 - 111
Edwina V W Proudfoot
112 - 128
NS 863812. Three phases of occupation adjacent to the Roman forts were represented by two successive circular timber houses separated in time by a straight bedding trench. A complex defensive system could not be related to the site sequence, which is apparently of 1st-2nd centuries AD. Pollen suggests hay-meadows.
Edwina V W Proudfoot
112 - 128
Séamas Caulfield
129 - 139
Quern evidence provides a clear separation between the northern brochs, most of which have saddle rather than rotary querns, and the western brochs, where only rotaries are found. The broch tradition must therefore have originated in N Scotland and spread from there into the west. AR
William S Hanson
140 - 150
Reappraises the grouping of temporary camps conventionally assigned (by size and form) to the campaigns of Agricola and Severus respectively. Other historical contexts are suggested for the construction of some; and fresh excavations at Ardoch proved that the 130 acre camp postdated that of 63 acres. Clearly the complexities are not yet fully understood. D G
Norman McCord
J Tait
151 - 165
[NS 8680]. Excavations showed that the fort defences extended to form an ?integrally planned annexe defended on the E side by four ditches. Structural and pottery evidence indicate two Antonine phases, with final abandonment by AD 160. The nature of the annexe is unclear (succession of temporary wooden structures). D G
Trevor G Cowie
166 - 201
NT 148743. Excavation around the Catstane confirmed disturbance at its foot and revealed long cist burials arranged to respect a space 7-8m diameter round the stone. Results of excavating 52 graves to E and SE of the stone failed to correlate with the 19th century excavation report, and bone preservation was poor. A 5th century start for the cemetery is suggested. A R
Trevor G Cowie
166 - 201
Kevin J Edwards
Ian Ralston
202 - 210
NJ 108692. Pollen analysis and new radiocarbon determinations indicate that the construction of the timber-laced promontory fort may have begun as early as 3rd century AD in an open grassland environment, and the destruction of the fort by fire may have been as late as 900. A R
Ian A G Shepherd
Alexandra N Shepherd
211 - 222
NJ 497263. Ploughing uncovered a large unbroken stone bearing the incised profile of a bearded man, in long tunic and headdress, carrying an axe; comparisons are made with Golspie and Glamis examples. A fragment from the same field bears the Pictish beast and comb symbols and part of an S-shaped figure. A R
Rosemary J Cramp
Caroline Douglas-Home
223 - 232
H Gordon Slade
233 - 300
[NJ 722128]. A rectangular hall built c 1454 was converted into a Z-plan by the addition of a square and a round tower at opposite corners by Thomas Leiper c 1563-76. The house was greatly enlarged in two main phases between 1588 and 1636 (extra floors, and wings enclosing a courtyard) and a prison cell was provided. Full family history, study of the estate development, and record of 19th century renovations. R J Mercer (273-7) adds a note on the stone circle at NT 715125. DFR/Ed
Angus Graham
301 - 351
Reviews some significant contributions to Scottish archaeology which appeared in this periodical in the years 1930-71 and notes changes in methodology and presentation over time. Individual topics (eg chambered cairns, Roman antiquities, castles) are traced with a simple numerical analysis of numbers of articles.
W Graham
W G Jardine
352 - 355
Dorothy N Marshall
355
Joanna Close-Brooks
355 - 356
John Burton
Joanna Close-Brooks
357 - 360
Gordon J Barclay
361 - 366
Edwina V W Proudfoot
Angela Parker
366 - 368
Norman McCord
J Tait
368 - 372
Joanna Close-Brooks
372 - 374
Unpublished fragments of iron with bronze mounts prove to be, not armour, but part of a soldier's drinking flask.
John W Hedges
374 - 378
David H Caldwell
378 - 380
381 - 385
386 - 410