Issue: Internet Archaeology 16: A GIS with a view:

Publication Type:
Title: Internet Archaeology 16: A GIS with a view:
Year of Publication: 2004
Volume: 16
Number of Pages: 0
Note: Is Portmanteau:1Editorial Expansion:special section
URI: http://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue16/index.html
Journal Article Title Sort Order Both Arrows Access Type   Author / Editor   Page
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Abstract
Dimitrij Mlekuz
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the author challenges the status of vision in modern humanistic-oriented GIS studies and stresses the importance of multisensuous approaches within the study of past landscapes. The article offers some theoretical perspectives on the perception of sound and its role in social life, and reviews some conceptual problems concerning modelling perception within GIS. It guides the reader through the process of constructing a digital soundscape model, offers some technical and mathematical background and presents the use of a software package which is freely available with the paper. The main goal of the article is to develop tools and approaches to understand past soundscapes. The process of creating a soundscape model is illustrated using an example from Slovenia. The model presented is still in its infancy, and its rationale and potential are discussed
Doortje Van Hove
0
examines the implications of the implementation of taskscapes for past human practice, in which different interpretations of space, time and accumulated experience generate a variety of potential pictures of past human lives. The author considers these implications through land use modelling within the Italian Neolithic, using temporal GIS, and discusses outcomes of dynamic simulation models and interpretations of results to emphasise an alternative approach to Italian Neolithic culture
Caroline Phillips
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highlights the fact that there are cultural assumptions within spatial analyses, through examining the land-use systems practised by New Zealand Maori, and argues that models based on modern European land use are not necessarily appropriate for other times and cultures. This test case also supports the contextual archaeology definition of landscape as a dynamic inclusive system between people and land. It is concluded that the resolution of such problems, especially when analysing societies with a recent ethnography or history, requires a landscape approach together with multi-disciplinary data and the further development of dynamic modelling and simulation through GIS
Thomas G Whitley
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considers the two different forms taken by archaeological studies focusing on prehistoric cognition or motivation on the basis of GIS-generated interpretations -- North American use of GIS-based archaeological data in the context of so-called 'predictive modelling', or within typically large-scale interpretations of environmental motivations for settlement, and European use of GIS as a tool for reconstructing social and cognitive landscapes. The author considers the ways in which each tradition could benefit from the other, and in which these ideas could come together through the use key tools and of an enhanced discussion of explanation and causality
0
Proceedings of a TAG session organised at the University of Manchester in December 2002 exploring how the traditional archaeological view of GIS could be changed, especially in the light of specific archaeological theory. In particular, issues such as temporality, agency, socio-cultural concepts, cognition, perception and experience, are discussed. Includes
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0
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Ulla Rajala
0
discusses the relationship between philosophy, archaeological theory and the use of GIS. It is argued that although specific theoretical issues have been discussed, epistemological and ontological questions with regard to the characteristics of data and data processing have not been subjected to rigorous theoretical critique
Doortje Van Hove
Ulla Rajala
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discussion on GIS and archaeological theory, and the 2002 TAG session
Christine Longworth
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A study of sgraffito decorated pottery produced in he area around Buckley in north Wales in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. The article aims to establish the date of the production and range of early sgraffito wares at Buckley and to examine the derivation of the designs and illustrations on the vessels. An illustrated catalogue has been produced and a comparative study made of sgraffito wares elsewhere to place Buckley into a national and international context. Includes
Corinne Roughley
Colin Shell
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explores the potential of visibility analysis and dynamic visualisation for investigating the visual context of two of the Neolithic monument types of southern Brittany, the earthen long mounds and angled passage graves