Series: Jacobs Engineering UK unpublished report series

Jacobs Engineering Group
 ADS Digital Resource
Series Publication Type:
Publisher:
Year of Publication (Start): 2007
Year of Publication (End): 2013
Records per page:
Previous   Page 1 of 2   Next
Filter results by issue title, e.g. 'roman military station'
Filter:
Issue Title Sort Order Up Arrow Access Type Publication
Type
  Author / Editor   Abstract Publication
Year Sort Order Both Arrows
Anon
2009
Anon
2009
An archaeological watching brief was carried out during the excavation of 61 geotechnical trial pits along the line of the proposed Aberdeen Western Peripheral Route. No archaeological remains or deposits were noted.
2008
A Curtis
An archaeological watching brief was carried out during the excavation of 61 geotechnical trial pits along the line of the proposed Aberdeen Western Peripheral Route. No archaeological remains or deposits were noted.
2008
C Shaw
The assessment has to date identified a total of twenty one sites close to and within the route of the water main pipeline route. The most common sites recognised are Post Medieval structures. To mitigate against any potential damage to any of these sites, it is suggested that archaeological monitoring is carried out throughout the length of the pipeline upgrade though Brager
2007
C Shaw
Jacobs UK carried out a desk based assessment and walk over survey as a means of identifying known and potential archaeological features that may be affected by the proposed housing development at Braidbar Quarry, Giffnock. The desk-based assessment covered the Braidbar site (16 acres), and approximately 1 km beyond the site boundary. A total of 3 archaeological sites were identified within the site boundary, these comprised of in-filled and landscaped quarries which extend in to the proposed development area. Giffnock was well known for its quarries and it is recorded that sandstone was first quarried in this area in 1835. In its heyday the area was dominated with quarries including Braidbar, New Braidbar, Williamwood, Giffnock and New Giffnock. The quarries produced two types of stone, 'liver rock' and 'Moor rock'.
2007
A Curtis
An archaeological watching brief was carried out during the excavation of a bing at Brownsburn during remediation work at Target Tip to recover rare bricks and tiles for recording
2008
S Jack
2008
A Curtis
Jacobs Arup was commissioned by Transport Scotland to carry out an archaeological watching brief during the demolition of and recovery of two medieval marriage pediments and associated filial from the archway within the grounds of St. Margaret's Hope (NGR: NT 12308 81105, HB number 6405). The archway is a Category B-Listed structure and although there is no record noting its construction a Building Survey (Jacobs Arup 2010b) has shown it to be a composite folly that may be contemporary with the extensive renovations and extensions conducted in 1916 by the renowned English Arts and Crafts Architect Ernest Newton. Within its recent history the archway has been demolished and subsequently re-erected, as is evidenced by the inappropriate use of modern materials i.e. concrete blocks and Portland cement. The recovery operation was a success and the marriage pediments and filial were deposited with the Huntley House Museum, Royal Mile, Edinburgh.
2011
R B McNaught
2009
C Shaw
Jacobs has been commissioned by Scottish Water Solutions to carry out a desk-based assessment and Walk Over survey of the Cultural Heritage resource that may potentially be affected by the construction of an access road, waste water treatment works, outfall pipe and replacement sewer on the Eoropie headland. The assessment found eighteen known sites of archaeological and historical interest close to the route of the proposed sewer replacement some of Prehistoric date. A programme of archaeological monitoring was recommended by Mary Macleod of Comhairle nan Eilean Siar and was carried out by Rathmell Archaeology during the summer of 2007. No archaeological remains were located during this fieldwork.
2007
C Shaw
Jacobs Engineering UK was commissioned by Transport Scotland to carry out a level 2 Standing Building Survey at the archway within the grounds of St. Margaret's Hope (NGR: NT 12308 81105). The archway is a Category B-Listed structure and although there is no record noting its construction, it is presumed that the original arch was contemporary with St. Margaret's Hope House, which was build in 1829 by the renowned architect Ernest Newton. As it currently stands, the archway spans the main approach road to the house in a niche cut into the surrounding bedrock. From edge to edge the archway measures 5.36m and the attached battlement with crenulations measures 5.95m. Within its recent history it is visible that the upper portion of the archway has been demolished and subsequently re-erected as the stone work has not weathered greatly and there are modern concrete blocks incorporated within the segmented arch.
2010
P Bennett
2008
S Honeywell
2012
C Shaw
Jacobs UK has been commissioned by Scottish Water Solutions to carry out a desk-based assessment and walk over survey of the Cultural Heritage resource that may potentially be affected by the construction of numerous water mains within the Lemreway and Grabhair area. The main route of the pipeline runs from just north of Lemreway to Grabhair. The assessment found a total of twelve sites of archaeological and historical interest along and close to the route of the proposed water main replacement, mainly of Post Medieval and modern date. The desk based survey and walkover has revealed that the pipeline route is predominantly in embanked sections of the road or within areas where peat has been stripped out down to the subsoil/bedrock. As a result, Mary Macleod of Comhairle nan Eilean Siar Archaeology Unit has decided against the requirement for mitigation even in the form of archaeological monitoring.
2007
C Shaw
Jacobs Engineering UK was commissioned by Scottish Water CID to carry out archaeological monitoring in the form of a watching brief during the replacement of a section of sewage pipe at North Dell on the Isle of Lewis. The section extends from the outflow pipe at (NGR: NB 49476 62962) and extends to (NGR: NB 49847 62426) where it ties in with the existing sewage pipeline
2009
C Shaw
A Level 1 standing building appraisal has been undertaken at Happendon Prisoner of War Camp (NGR: NS 85261 33342, centred) in order to assess the structural remains in respects of the proposed development at Poneil in the form of an OCC mine and associated features such as topsoil storage and water treatment. The POW camp dates to the Second World War and is comprised of a complex of three camps; the main camp is located to the west and set within a large rectangular area. The later insertion of the M74 would have destroyed the other two camps and possibly compromised the eastern most corner of the central camp. Currently the central camp is comprised of a series of brick and concrete bases which formed the base for the Nissen Huts which were used to accommodate Italian and German prisoners of war.
2008
J Dempsey
A desk-based assessment and walkover survey was conducted to assess the potential impacts upon the Archaeology and Cultural Heritage resulting from the proposed insertion water mains, extending from from Trumaisgearraidh on North Uist (NGR: NF 87120 74490) to Aird Ma Ruibhe on Berneray (NGR: NF 91336 880161) a distance of approximately 8km. It is likely that the proposed works may impact directly upon the remains of archaeological features present within the study corridor. One hundred and fifty-four sites were identified within 300m of the proposed route of the new pipeline from a desk-based assessment and walkover survey. There is abundant indication that this area was occupied and exploited from as early as the Bronze Age period. One site has been identified that could potentially date to the Neolithic and two sites could potentially date to the Bronze Age period.
2008
K McKee
A desk-based assessment and walkover survey was conducted to assess the potential impacts upon the Archaeology and Cultural Heritage resulting from the insertion of a stretch of pipeline E-W from the western end of Leurbost to the western end of Crossbost (NB 3620 2567 - NB 3916 2454) and N-S from the eastern end of Leurbost to Bheinn a' Chladdich Mhoir (NB 3827 2475 - NB 3850 2280). Thirty-nine sites were identified within 100m of the proposed route of the new pipeline from a desk-based assessment and walkover survey. Eighteen of these sites were identified as pre-dating the first edition Ordnance Survey map and are associated with pre-clearance land-use, potentially being occupied from as far back as the early medieval period. A walkover survey of the proposed development recorded seventeen additional sites and verified the surviving remains of nine of the sites identified on the first edition Ordnance Survey map. The presence of so many sites within the study area suggests that there is a high potential for archaeological remains to occur ranging from the early medieval period to the post medieval period. To mitigate against any potential damage to these sites, it was suggested that a system of micrositing should take place prior to any groundbreaking works being carried out. and that archaeological monitoring is carried out wherever groundbreaking works are undertaken.
2008
K McKee
C Shaw
The assessment has to date identified a total of ten sites within the proposed routes of the gravity main. The presence of numerous archaeological sites close to the study areas indicates that the archaeological potential of the study area is high
2008
 
Previous   Page 1 of 2   Next