Series: Glasgow University Archaeological Research Division (GUARD) unpublished report series

GUARD
 ADS Digital Resource
Series Publication Type:
Publisher:
Year of Publication (Start): 2007
Year of Publication (End): 2010
Records per page:
Previous   Page 1 of 1   Next
Filter results by issue title, e.g. 'roman military station'
Filter:
Issue Title Sort Order Up Arrow Access Type Publication
Type
  Author / Editor   Abstract Publication
Year Sort Order Both Arrows
C Rennie
From August to October 2007, GUARD carried out a monitoring of restoration and conservation works at Alloway Auld Kirk and Kirkyard, South Ayrshire on behalf of ARP Lorimer and Associates. During the removal of the existing public footpath around Alloway Auld Kirk, large quantities of human remains and two previously unmarked graves were uncovered. These remains were disarticulated and had clearly been disturbed at an earlier date, probably during work to create the existing footpath. The human remains have been re-interred in an appropriate manner.
2008
I Arabaolaza
A walkover survey was conducted on Auchineden Hill to identify and record the remains of any upstanding archaeological sites surviving within the proposed development site. There are several known archaeological sites in the surrounding area. Queen's View, at its north east, a scheduled burnt mound (NMRS NS58SW13) and Stockie Muir chambered long cairn (SAM 2281; NMRS NS48SE 6) at its north west, are some of them. Eleven previously unrecorded sites were identified during the walkover survey, though none of them have high or even moderate archaeological significance.
2009
R Toolis
An archaeological evaluation was carried out by Glasgow University Archaeological Research Division (GUARD), on behalf of Bett Homes, on an area proposed for development at Baldragon, Dundee. The trial trench evaluation of 5% of the total area proposed for development (2.25 ha). No significant archaeological features were encountered during the evaluation. The work was undertaken between 9 and 10 August 2010.
2010
D Sneddon
A metal detector survey of two sites, at Ladywell Park (Site 1) and New Line Road (Site 2), Bannockburn, Stirling, both proposed to be used as cemeteries, and an archaeological evaluation of the second of these sites were undertaken on behalf of Stirling Council in order to fulfil a condition placed on the proposed works by the Stirling Council Archaeologist. Both of the sites are within the area where it is suspected that the Battle of Bannockburn took place in 1314. As a result, a metal detector survey was to be carried out prior to any development to ensure that any significant artefacts relating to the battle were recovered from the topsoil. An archaeological evaluation was also undertaken on the second site. There, a Roman Road is depicted on the first edition Ordnance Survey map of 1865-6, running across the proposed development area. All but one of the finds from the metal detector survey of the Ladywell Park site related to the very late nineteenth century and the twentieth century; most are coins. The only find of potentially earlier date is a large pewter spoon head, possibly dating to the eighteenth century. No artefacts recovered could be assigned definitely to the Battle of Bannockburn. The metal detector survey of the New Line Road site also recovered a series of nineteenth- and twentieth-century artefacts. In addition, a series of coins, buttons and two musket balls were found, which may date to the eighteenth century. It is known that there was Jacobite activity in this area in 1746 relating to the siege of Stirling Castle and the battle of Falkirk. It is possible that these eighteenth-century artefacts recovered from the New Line Road site relate to this activity. No artefacts recovered could be assigned definitely to the Battle of Bannockburn.
2007
D Sneddon
Robert S Will
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken of the site off the High Street, Glasgow, which had previously been the college goods yard railway depot. The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the potential that archaeological deposits pre dating the railway yard survived. The western part of the site, beneath the railway yard deposits, consisted of made up ground that extended beyond the 4-5 m excavation in the test pits within the main trench. In the eastern area of the site the natural slope down to the molendinar burn was located in two trenches, one of which showed modification and management of the drainage on the slope prior to infilling. In the southern area of the eastern side of the site the lowest level of sandstone built cottage was located. It was not clear whether the cottage was present when the burn was open or whether it was constructed after the burn had been canalised and infilled. In general it appeared that the eastern most part of the site had been heavily truncated removing any chance of archaeological remains surviving. The point from the mid parts of trenches 1 and 2 westward did, however, show potential for archaeological remains being preserved, particularly those to the east of the culverted burn.
2008
I Arabaolaza
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken by Glasgow University Archaeological Research Division (GUARD) on Croft Street, Tarbolton, Mauchline, Ayrshire. A total of 53 trenches were opened covering 8% of the site or 4616 m2. All the trenches were archaeologically sterile.
2009
C Rennie
An archaeological monitoring programme was carried out by Glasgow University Archaeological Research Division (GUARD) at the site of a proposed water treatment plant and related works at Dervaig, Isle of Mull. The work was carried out in two phases. Phase 1 was a monitored topsoil strip at the location of the septic tanks and treatment plant. Phase 2 involved digging eight test pits along the route of the rising main and an evaluation trench from the Darvaig to Salen road to the treatment plant. No archaeological remains were found and no artefacts were recovered during this work.
2008
C Rennie
A geophysical survey was undertaken by GUARD, of a proposed cemetery development area at land south of Ferneyhill Toll, Kelso. The survey of 40% of the proposed development area was followed by test pitting in areas where geophysical anomalies were encountered. Three linear features and two possible structures were encountered during the survey, but it could not be ascertained if these features related to the medieval hospital of St Leonards, or the post-medieval farmstead of Spittal, which documentary and cartographic records indicate formerly occupied this site.
2010
I Arabaolaza
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken by GUARD prior to the proposed Forth Valley College development in Alloa, due to the location of a putative cairn (Hawk Hill Cairn B) within the development area and the proximity of another cairn (Hawk Hill Cairn A) itself a Scheduled Ancient Monument. Trial trenching amounting to a 5% sample of the development area was excavated. An earth bank of probably modern date was encountered on the location of the putative cairn (Hawk Hill Cairn B). No other archaeological remains of any significance were encountered.
2009
I Arabaolaza
Due to the proximity of prehistoric, medieval and post-medieval sites within the surrounding area, an archaeological evaluation was undertaken by GUARD of an area proposed for development at Freelands Road, Ratho. No significant archaeological features were encountered during the evaluation.
2010
L H Innes
P Murtagh
An archaeological evaluation was carried on waste ground off Green St and London Road, in the east end of Glasgow, with the intention of locating and assessing the survival of Christie's Clay Pipe factory. One evaluation trench was excavated on the site, orientated N-S measuring 19m in length by 5m metres in width at the northern end and 3m in width at the southern end. It was 0.8m in depth along the eastern side and 1.5m in depth on the western side. The remains of a well preserved brick surface, probably relating to the factory floor, was discovered, measuring 10m N-S, and extending below the trench edges to the E and W. The bricks were all hand made. No concrete evidence as to the presence of a kiln was discovered during the evaluation. Although some circumstantial evidence was recovered; such as a slagged surface, commonly found on other clay pipe factory sites, and a number of clay pipes.
2008
I Arabaolaza
Due to previous documentary and cartographic records for a potential prehistoric cist burial and an early modern building within the western extension area of Lomond Quarry to the north of Leslie in Fife, GUARD were commissioned to undertake an archaeological watching brief during topsoil stripping works. No significant archaeological remains were encountered.
2010
C Rennie
Archaeological monitoring of ground-breaking works associated with the re-landscaping and renovation of North Canal Bank, Clydebank was carried out by Glasgow University Archaeological Research Division (GUARD) on behalf of AEL Enterprises Limited. The monitoring was required in order to comply with a condition attached to the Scheduled Monument Consent issued by Historic Scotland for all ground-breaking works within five metres of the Forth and Clyde Canal. During the monitoring, some sandstone blocks that may represent the remains of the original canal wall were uncovered. These were found two metres from the new canal wall and had been partially destroyed, being intermixed with more modern building debris.
2008
E Masson-Maclean
An archaeological watching brief was undertaken during the construction of a new access road through North Slipperfield Estate. The watching brief was required as a condition of planning consent due to the proximity of North Slipperfield Roman Temporary Camp, of which the visible remains of its northern corner lay to the north of the new access route. No significant archaeological remains were encountered.
2009
Ronan Toolis
An archaeological watching brief was undertaken by GUARD during the excavation of a soakaway pit to the south-west of the new extension of Old Melrose House. The watching brief was required as a condition of planning consent due to the proximity of the site of Old Melrose Monastery and St Cuthbert's Chapel. A single E/W aligned wall foundation 6.8 long, 0.60 m wide and 0.15 m deep, comprising unmortared sandstone blocks, one course deep and wide and including one dressed stone block was recorded. This was immediately overlain by buried topsoil containing 19th and 20th century finds, and redeposited natural subsoil, indicative of modern landscaping. No finds associated with the wall foundation were encountered and therefore the wall is undated. No other significant archaeological remains were observed.
2009
I Arabaolaza
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken by GUARD prior to the proposed nursery development in Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen. A trial trench amounting to a 2% sample of the development area was excavated by hand. No archaeological remains of any significance were encountered.
2009
I Arabaolaza
Due to the proximity of a medieval ford and potential bridge across the River Forth, and a post-medieval farmhouse site, an archaeological evaluation was undertaken by GUARD in February 2010, in advance of the proposed development within the former Kildean Auction Market site on the Drip Road in Raploch, Stirling. The trial trench evaluation, amounting to 665 m² in total, encountered no significant archaeological features.
2010
Beverley Ballin-Smith
An archaeological investigation of the eighteenth-century double basin, the basin mouth where it joined the Forth and Clyde Canal and the nineteenth-century slipway and slipway finger were conducted at Southbank, Kirkintilloch. The canal is a Scheduled Ancient Monument, and additions, repairs and alterations to features beside it as part of the new development, were also monitored.The background to the development and use of the basin was also investigated, as various industries had targeted the basin for its convenient access to the canal and outlets to the west and east. The dressed walls of the basin survived up to 2 m in height when revealed from beneath 1960s infill, although their upper courses were missing. Stop log channels in the walls for stop planks across the passage between the two halves of the basin were also preserved. The basin mouth survived to its full height of nearly 5 m, its walls resting on a foundation of concrete and pebbles lying directly on the subsoil. It also had stop log channels for taking stop planks to divide the waters of the basin from those of the canal. Evidence survived that the slipway was a much later addition, as it was built for the construction of 'puffers'. The softwood timbers of the slipway ramp for the launching and repairing of boats survived and were noted to be covered in bitumen. The investigations of the slipway finger revealed that it originally had a sandstone bollard for mooring which was replaced in metal when the surface of the finger was renewed. The end of the finger was also extended and the whole resurfaced before its general demise in the 1960s.
2008
F Heather
Heather F James
Watching brief and evaluation
2009
D M Maguire
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken on behalf of William Grant and Sons Distillers Ltd in 2008. The project was designed to evaluate the footprint of a proposed warehouse and associated access road. Twelve evaluation trench were opened. Although deep deposits of redeposited natural were observed, no archaeological remains were encountered
2008
 
Previous   Page 1 of 1   Next