Series: Rebecca Shaw Archaeological Services unpublished report series

Rebecca Shaw Archaeological Services
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Year of Publication (Start): 2007
Year of Publication (End): 2013
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Shaw Rebecca
An archaeological watching brief was carried out for Luddon Construction Ltd on behalf of their client. The works were undertaken in respect of an extension to a grade 'B' listed building located at 14 Montgomery Street, East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire. The works revealed a fairly recent cobbled surface which on turn lay on top of an earlier tarmac surface. The subsoil was a brown clay but in many area the clay was dirty as it had been re-deposited due to the insertion of numerous service pipes. No negative features, structures or residual artefacts were revealed within the development area during the course of the archaeological monitoring works.
2010
R Shaw
An archaeological watching brief was carried on the 31st June to the 1st July 2008 for Coastal Capers Ltd. The works were undertaken in respect to the construction of a two new dwelling structures site located on land at 18 Ritchie Street, Millport, Isle of Cumbrae. The works revealed demolition material as well as what appeared to be a midden-like levelling layer, both of these came down onto either a clay, sand or sandy clay subsoil, though bedrock was close to the surface some areas. The watching brief identified no archaeological material during excavation groundbreaking works.
2008
R Shaw
A programme of archaeological works was required at 19 Market Street, Stranraer, prior to redevelopment works, as part of the requirement of the issued planning consent. A level 1-2 standing building survey was undertaken on the 11th March and 1st April 2008 and an evaluation was carried out on the 2nd and 3rd April. With the exception of the eastern gable which is stone and mortar rubble construction the rest of the structure, which was red brick, probably dates to the early 20th century with later repairs and additions. The sequence of five trenches sited randomly across the proposed development area identified no significant archaeological features. Cobbling however, was located in a number of trenches and probably dated to the late Victorian period when the two building fronting onto Market St and Fisher Street respectively, became one building. A discreet deposit of waste associated with a clamp or lime kiln was also located in one small area of the site, indicating industrial actively in the vicinity. Clinker debris presumably from the nearby railway had been used to level the site on top of the cobbles prior to a concrete floor being laid. Although the site of our structure undoubtedly housed a small dwelling structure with a backland or garden area in the early to mid 1840's, no features, structures or finds relating to this period were located. There are no indications that the as it existed prior to demolition had ever been used as a dwelling.
2008
Shaw Claire
A programme of archaeological investigative works was undertaken in respect of the proposed extension at 23 Campsie View, Kirkintilloch, East Dunbartonshire. The works were undertaken as part of the requirement of the issued planning consent to allow the client to fully discharge the terms of the condition of consent.The works comprised archaeological monitoring of the excavation of the foundation trenches for the proposed new extension. During the course of the works no features of archaeological significance were observed.
2012
R Shaw
A programme of archaeological monitoring works were undertaken at the Camphill Vaults, 1-3 Main Street, Bothwell. The works were carried out from the 9th to the 12th June 2008 and comprised monitoring of the reduction of the ground level for the footprint of the new extension. A roughly rectangular red sandstone structure measuring 11m by 5m internally and divided into two compartments with one main entrance and as well as an access between the two compartments. The walls averaged 1m in width with both entrances measuring more than 1m. No finds were located but cartographic evidence indicates that the structure dates from between 1816 and 1859 and was demolished between 1963 and 1974. The thickness of its walls and width of the entrances indicate that the structure was probably originally used for some form of industrial or storage purpose rather than a dwelling, though it was possibly used as a dwelling latterly.
2008
R Shaw
An archaeological evaluation trench was carried out on the 10th September 2008 on behalf of Clydebank Rebuilt URC. The works were undertaken in respect to the proposed erection of forty flats at a site located on Cart Street, Clydebank, West Dunbartonshire. There was the potential for remains associated with the Forth and Cart Canal to be located running along the western and northern areas of the site. The Forth and Cart Canal, which was constructed to link the Forth and Clyde Canal with the River Clyde was opened in 1840 and closed in 1893. It is not known if the canal, which would have run along the western edge of the site was entirely removed or just infilled but the eastern half was heavily disturbed by the construction of a railway line on the site in 1896 by Lanarkshire and Dumbartonshire Railway. The evaluation trench revealed a depth of infill material, comprising various deposits, at least 1.25m in depth across the northern end of the site (the limit of excavation undertaken). Although structural remains and deposits relating to the later railway were located, the canal and any other associated remains with its use, if they still survive, must lie below 1.25m.
2008
R Shaw
Rebecca Shaw Archaeological Services were appointed to undertake the works by John Hair from Cowal and Trossachs Forest District on behalf of Forestry Commission Scotland in regards to a proposed forest road. The road measures roughly 9km in length through the Cruach Tairbeirt Forest.
2009
Shaw Rebecca
A programme of archaeological investigative works was undertaken on an area of land at Dinwoodie House Hotel, Johnstonebridge, Lockerbie. The works, which comprised a series of evaluation trenches laid the proposed development area, were carried on the 22nd and 23rd November 2010. The trenches exhibited a mid brown fine silty topsoil on top of a reddish brown or orangey red slightly clayey silt containing a moderate to frequent amount of small stones to a pinky brown fairly compact stony silt. The remains of a stony track, thought to date to circa 1900 at the earliest was revealed during investigative works. No significant archaeological features were identified.
2010
Shaw Rebecca
A prgramme of archaeological investigation works was required at the site known as Glengyre, near Leswalt, Stranraer as part of the requirement of the issued planning consent. An evaluation was carried out on the 29th and 30th of October 2007, comprising a sequence of seven trenches sited randomly across the proposed develpment area. No significant archaeological features were identified during the course of the evaluation. the very denuded remains of a possible earlier settlement site, which comprises slightly stony grassy outlines, are visible on a slight rise to the immediate west of the proposed development area (centered on NW 99556 65247)
2007
R Shaw
Archaeological monitoring works were undertaken on land at Banks Hill, Dundrennan, Kirkcudbrightshire as a condition of the issued planning consent. The works were required as the proposed works were located in close proximity to a number of cup and ring marked rocks. The monitoring works mainly revealed a mid to light brown fairly fine silty topsoil and either a pale yellow / orange clay containing small stones or a grey / orange clay subsoil. Large sub-angular stones and areas of shattered bedrock were visible within the subsoil and bedrock was visible close to the surface in places. A small oval pit with a compacted ashy fill was uncovered during the excavations for the service track. The pit contained small fragments of charcoal and burnt bone, which was identified as animal. Radiocarbon dating undertaken on the burnt bone dated the pit to the late Bronze Age. It is therefore be prudently suggested that the pit is contemporary with the cup and ring marks located within close proximity.
2013
Shaw Rebecca
A programme of archaeological investigative works were undertaken on an area of land located at Seal Bay, Kildonan, Isle of Arran (centred on: NGR NS 017 212). The works comprised a series of evaluation trenches laid out in a grid pattern across the proposed development area. Although initially only one house plot had detailed consent with a watching brief condition attached, WoSAS agreed that as a further five house plots had outline consent, an evaluation would be an acceptable method by which to proceed, rather than a watching brief on each separate house as it was constructed. The trenches exhibited a fine slightly clayey silty topsoil on top of either a clay subsoil with occasional stones or a gravelly subsoil with areas of sand or silt. No significant archaeological features were identified.
2009
R Shaw
An archaeological watching brief was carried on the 28th February and 7th - 8th April 2007 for Wayne Thornton of Island Developments Ltd. The works were undertaken in respect to the construction of a new dwelling with associated septic tank, drainage / soakaway and access road, on a site located to the north of Arnabost Cottage, Isle of Coll (centred on NGR: NM 2092 6032). The watching brief identified no archaeological material during the topsoil stripping or groundbreaking works.
2008
 
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