Series: Oakford Archaeology unpublished report series

Oakford Archaeology
 ADS Digital Resource

Primary Contact: Marc Steinmetzer email
Associated OrganisationOakford Archaeology
Series Publication Type:
Publisher:
Year of Publication (Start): 2011
Year of Publication (End): 2018
Records per page:
Previous   Page 1 of 6   Next
Filter results by issue title, e.g. 'roman military station'
Filter:
Issue Title Sort Order Up Arrow Access Type Publication
Type
  Author / Editor   Abstract Publication
Year Sort Order Both Arrows
J M Allan
N Shiel
M F R Steinmetzer
An archaeological evaluation was carried out by Oakford Archaeology on land adjacent to Wessex Close, Topsham, Devon, between April and May 2014. The work comprised the excavation of 8 trenches totalling 175m in length, with each trench 1.6m wide. These targeted a series of anomalies identified during an earlier geophysical survey and provided a spatial sample of those areas that were not available for geophysical survey. Excavation revealed three ditches of Romano-British date, as well as the remains of two large pits. Only the two NW-SE aligned ditches had been identified by the geophysical survey. The fills contained quantities of mid-to-late Romano-British tile and pottery, indicating the nearby presence of buildings and occupation of the site perhaps into the 4th century AD. The trenches identified a further two ditches and three discrete features of probable Romano-British date and a trackway with flanking ditches of post-medieval date. None of these had been identified by the geophysical survey.
2014
M F R Steinmetzer
Catherine Langdon
Robert G Scaife
Michael J Allen
A geotechnical borehole survey was undertaken in July 2016 by South West Geotechnical Ltd for Exeter City Council, at Rougemont Gardens, Exeter, Devon. The survey work was monitored and recorded by Oakford Archaeology, and, with the subsequent environmental assessment, was undertaken in response to scheduled monument consent granted to Exeter City Council for the borehole survey. The sequences of deposits identified during the survey, for the most part, consisted of rampart material belonging to the inner bailey defences of the Norman castle. However, boreholes 4, 6 and 8 identified a buried soil overlying bedrock and sealed by rampart material, while borehole 2 exposed clay deposits containing a large proportion of small trap fragments, possibly representing the remains of bank material associated with the earlier Roman rampart at the rear of the city wall. The boreholes through the base of the inner ditch exposed volcanic basalt bedrock at a depth of 3m below ground level. The sequence contained initial silting at the base of the ditch followed by large-scale primary infilling. Deposits of made up ground, associated with the late 18th century Rougemont House and gardens, were recorded in borehole 9. Finds retrieved during the investigation included 6 sherds of 16th and 17th coarse- and stonewares sherds from the path and levelling deposits associated with the construction of Rougemont House and the laying out of the formal gardens. The geoarchaeological assessment indicates that no significant palaeoenvironmental or geoarchaeological deposits or materials were present within the borehole cores. A poorly preserved and mixed buried soil survived under the inner bailey rampart. Its poor survival and disturbance is likely due to activity associated with the construction of the rampart. The absence of pollen in this soil might, in part, be attributed to this disturbance and mixing.
2016
M F R Steinmetzer
In April 2017 Oakford Archaeology monitored the installation of four borehole piezometers on Exeter Cathedral Green and a fifth in St Catherine's Chapel within the Cathedral. Two (boreholes 1-2) were located in the former cemetery on the north side of the nave, and two (boreholes 3-4) further to the east in the area formerly occupied by the Treasurer's House. The exercise allowed the recording of the full depth of archaeological deposits in parts of the Cathedral Close where only shallow excavations have been undertaken in the past, providing valuable information towards the modelling of deposits in the Close. Deposits are 1.7-1.8m deep in the area of the Treasurer's House and St Catherine's Chapel, 1.55m deep towards the northern side of the cemetery and 2.1m deep in the part of the cemetery closest to the cathedral. In Boreholes 1 and 2, probable early Roman deposits were recorded below medieval/early modern charnel soils, covered in turn by 19th-century landscaping and modern topsoil. Early Roman layers were also encountered in Boreholes 3 and 4; the sequence was especially well-preserved in Borehole 4. Remains of a later wall foundation were also exposed in Borehole 3, below demolition and later landscaping deposits. They probably represent a wall of the medieval Treasurer's House, which stood on the site until its demolition in the early 19th century. No firm interpretation is offered for the undated and apparently uniform deposit recorded in Borehole 5 below the late 13th-century floor of St Catherine's chapel. Finds included Roman pottery, fragments of Roman tile (three of them derived from a building heated by a hypocaust, probably indicating the presence of a late Roman town house with at least one heated room) and a medieval floor-tile.
2017
M Steinmetzer
R W Parker
Archaeological building recording was undertaken by Oakford Archaeology in October 2012 during building work at Barne House, Christow, Devon . The site lies at the centre of the village of Christow. Barne House is a Grade II Listed House with early 19th century origins. The building consists of a three bay symmetrical front, double depth plan with a central corridor and service rooms to the rear. Building recording was undertaken before works associated with the removal of the dividing wall between the current kitchen and conservatory. The subsequent demolition of the wall was also monitored. The position and context of the wall in relation to the site boundary suggests that this represents the infilling of an oddly-shaped area left over between the house and the curving site boundary. As such it seems most likely to be either contemporary with, or later than the house. The wall contained no dateable features, but the manner of its construction, without separate dressings, using lime mortar, and with timber lacing set into the wall to provide fixings for the door frame, are not suggestive of great antiquity. The house is of a classic late 18th-19th century appearance with a simple 2-storey double fronted elevation facing south-west, sash windows with six over six glass panes and no sash horns, and panelled reveals to a central doorway. A spine wall divides the building into a rough 'double-pile' plan, but under a single roof. It is likely that the outbuilding is either contemporary with or later than the late 18th-19th century building.
2012
L Brown
M F R Steinmetzer
Historical building recording was undertaken in March 2014 by Oakford Archaeology during building work at No 52 Northernhay Street, Exeter, Devon. The work was carried out as a condition of planning permission granted by Exeter City Council for change of use from existing commercial property to two dwellings. In May 2014 scaffolding was erected on the outside face of the city wall in Northernhay Street for the repointing and general maintenance of the masonry and OA undertook a second phase of building recording. This phase of work was commissioned by Exeter City Council in response to the redevelopment of No 52. Extensive building recording of the city wall elsewhere was undertaken between 1978 and 1993 by Exeter Archaeology. The results and historic development were fully described by Stuart Blaylock and will not be discussed here. From the boundary of Northgate Court and 51 Northernhay Street a stretch of 6.7m of facework was recorded in 2014. Three main facework builds were seen, although the facework on the ground floor was covered in modern masonry and the first floor was partly covered in paint, making detailed recording difficult.
2014
M Steinmetzer
This report presents the results of building recording undertaken by Oakford Archaeology (OA) on a building at Trengothal Farm, St Levan, Cornwall in November 2011 (SX 3777 2486). The western farmhouse is one of a number of ancient farms that make up the hamlet of Trengothal. The core of the main house probably dates to the 17th century, although it has been extensively rebuilt and modified in the 19th century, while the development of the farmbuildings also displays a complex history of enlargement and alterations. The nature of the earliest building, shown on the 1842 tithe map and extending north from the main farmhouse is unclear. The fact that at least one small recess survived within the north wall might suggest that at least part of the building was used to house livestock as they are commonly encountered in feeding passages of cowsheds or stables. By the middle of the 19th century this building was partly demolished and replaced by an extension (on the same footprint) of the main farmhouse. How much of the earlier building survived is unclear. The building break seen in both the south and north elevations seems to indicate that it was some time before the later building was added By the second half of the 19th century a further building had been attached to the north end of the farmhouse extension. It is unclear whether the dates (?) on the roof trusses indicate a date for the construction of the building. While the first floor has always been used for crop storage, there was little left to suggest the function of the ground floor. Following the expansion of cattle husbandry on the farm in the mid-late 19th century and the construction of a barn, stable and cart shed to the south of the farmhouse, the function of the ground floor may have been for the storage of farm implements.
2011
M F R Steinmetzer
An archaeological evaluation was carried out by Oakford Archaeology in December 2017 on land behind Holly Berry Lane, Lee Mill, Devon. The work comprised the machine-excavation of 10 trenches totaling 360m in length, with each trench 1.6m wide. These targeted a series of anomalies identified during an earlier geophysical survey and provided a spatial sample of those areas that were not available for geophysical survey. The remains of a large sub-square enclosure and evidence for internal linear sub-divisions, the remains of a single building, as well as two pits, were identified in trenches 5, 6, 7 and 8 across the centre of the site. The features had largely naturally infilled and no finds were recovered from these. In addition, due to intensive ploughing no remains of banked ramparts associated with the enclosure were identified. Trenches to the north and northwest of the enclosure identified the remains of two ditches running in a north-westerly direction, their alignment not inconsistent with boundary features of prehistoric date. While there were no finds recovered from the enclosure in particular and the site in general, the character of the features and its correlation with the alignment of the current field system, indicates that they likely represent evidence for medieval activity. A single posthole, located at the northern end of the site has been radiocarbon dated to the late Saxon period. A single posthole returned a radiocarbon date of late Neolithic or Early Bronze Age date.
2018
M F R Steinmetzer
An archaeological evaluation was carried out by Oakford Archaeology in April 2017 on land behind Pine Tree Lodge, Abbotskerswell, Devon. The work comprised the machine-excavation of 3 trenches totalling 50m in length, with each trench 1.6m wide. These targeted a series of buildings identified on the 1841 Tithe map. The heavily robbed out remains of at least three buildings, shown on 19th century mapping, were present in trenches across the site. The remains included a single wall foundation, three robber trenches and a single drain. No evidence was found of floor surfaces or discrete features preceding the buildings. No finds were recovered pre-dating the 19th century.
2017
M Steinmetzer
An archaeological trench evaluation and historic building recording was undertaken by Oakford Archaeology in March 2012 in advance of development at Moorshead, Deancombe, Devon (SX 7129 6340). The site is part of a Dartmoor longhouse, probably built during the middle of the 15th century, and fallen into ruin during the 20th century. The work was required under a condition attached to the grant of planning permission (ref. 0135/11). Prior to commencing works the south-west elevation of the longhouse was drawn. Unfortunately this had been re-pointed in anticipation of the works. Little information could be gathered from this, other than that the south-east corner of the building had been partly re-built to support the roof over the garage. The evaluation comprised the excavation of a single E-W aligned trench, measuring 3.6m by 1 m, and 0.35m deep. Trench 1 was archaeologically sterile. The area had previously been reduced and infilled with concrete rubble and soil (101), thereby removing any potential archaeological remains. The evaluation has demonstrated that the area of the proposed development is archaeologically sterile. No features or deposits were found to indicate archaeological activity within the trench. The area had been reduced by the previous owners sometime in the 1980's. The lack of pottery and lithics from the site, despite examination of spoil heaps, further indicates that the potential for significant archaeological survival is low. As a result, it was agreed with the DNPA Archaeologist that no further archaeological site work was necessary.
2012
M F R Steinmetzer
In March 2014 Oakford Archaeology were commissioned by SLR Consulting to undertake an archaeological evaluation at Coombe Court, Moretonhampstead. The house is a grade II listed building and is thought to have a 17th century longhouse at its core. The shippon and cross passage have been demolished and the remainder of the house has been heavily replanned in the 19th and 20th centuries. Two wings were added in the 18th centuries. The work was therefore required by the Dartmoor National Park Authority under a condition attached to the grant of planning permission (0485/13). Description of works: An archaeological evaluation was carried out prior to the start of groundworks. Four trenches, measuring 25m in total, were excavated, across the shippon, cross-passage, and inside the hall and dining room. The heavily robbed-out south and east walls (102 and 103) of the Shippon were identified in Trench 1. These were located at a depth of 0.5m below present ground level. They were between 0.5-0.7m wide and consisted of unbonded granite rubble. A continuation of the south wall (202) was identified in Trench 2. This was approximately 1.2m wide and spread towards the south, possibly as a result of robbing. No evidence of the east wall, the cross-passage or floors was found. This is not entirely surprising as the internal levels would probably have been higher than the external levels, due to the ground sloping away naturally towards the east, and removed when the shippon was demolished. Trenches 3 and 4 showed that the earlier floors had been removed when the modern concrete floors were inserted. However, following the removal of the suspended concrete floor in the hall three large granite slabs were uncovered immediately in front of the fireplace. These formed part of an earlier arrangement; although the rear of the fireplace had been patched up with granite rubble and some early 19th century bricks.
2014
M F R Steinmetzer
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken by Oakford Archaeology on land at Brookfield Farm, Farway, Devon, during April 2015. The work comprised the excavation of 24 trenches totalling 360m in length, with each trench 1.6m wide.. Excavation revealed a single ditch of probable post-medieval date. No dating evidence was recovered from this feature. Evidence for earlier activity was confined to two trenches at the southern end of the site where two ditches of possible prehistoric date were exposed. These were however undated. Further evidence for prehistoric activity was restricted to seven pieces of worked flint and 10 pieces of burnt unworked flint recovered from the topsoil.
2015
M F R Steinmetzer
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken by Oakford Archaeology at Knowle Battery, St Budeaux, Plymouth, during December 2014. The work comprised the excavation of 4 trenches totalling 27m in length, with each trench 1.6m wide. These targeted the now demolished western wall, the military road and the parade ground. Excavation revealed remains of the massive western wall of the battery, while work in the southwest of the development area exposed made ground deposits relating to the construction of the military road in the late 19th century. No earlier features or deposits were found in the remaining trenches.
2014
M Steinmetzer
The site lies within the historic core of Lympstone, immediately to the east of the Parish church of St Mary's. Lympstone House to the north dates to the mid-19th century, a replacement building for an earlier dwelling that lay further to the west and is shown on the 1841 Tithe Map. This map also shows a small 'L'-shaped building immediately north of the development footprint. Archaeological work to the south-west has recovered an assemblage of artefacts that include Mesolithic and Neolithic flint and a large amount of pottery sherds, including late Bronze Age/early Iron Age, late Saxon/early Norman, medieval, and post-medieval suggesting a continuity of human occupation in the area over several thousand years. An evaluation was carried out prior to the start of groundworks. Three trenches, measuring 30m in total, were excavated, covering the footprint of the proposed development. These revealed modern disturbance extending across the whole of the site.
2013
M F R Steinmetzer
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken by Oakford Archaeology on land at Slade House Farm, Branscombe, Devon, during March 2015. The work comprised the excavation of 6 trenches totalling 88m in length, with each trench 1.6m wide. No archaeological features were found in the immediate area. Excavation revealed the remains of two tree-throws, while a series of modern made ground deposits, in part overlying the original ground surface, were recorded across the central area of the site. Evidence for earlier activity was restricted to 23 flints recovered from the topsoil. In addition, an archaeological watching brief was undertaken by Oakford Archaeology (OA) between August 2015 and May 2016 on works associated with the construction of the new restaurant and water main. No deposits, features or dating evidence indicative of archaeological activity was found. The lack of pottery and other artefacts from the trenches, despite examination of spoil heaps, further indicates that these areas are archaeologically sterile.
2015
M Steinmetzer
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken by Oakford Archaeology in April 2014 on land adjacent to St George's Church, Shillingford St George, Devon. The work was required under a condition attached to planning consent for the extension to the churchyard for interment. The graveyard extension lies to the south-east of the church. The church is grade II* listed and probably started as a domestic chapel before being enlarged in the late 15th century by Sir William Huddesfield, Attorney General under Edward IV. The tower and the north transept date to this period, while the remainder of the building was substantially rebuilt during the 19th century. The Tithe map shows a much smaller graveyard and a narrow strip of land to the east of the church which may have been reordered when the rectory was built in the early 19th century. By 1880 the Ordnance Survey map shows that the graveyard has been extended to the south The evaluation comprised the excavation of 2 trenches: 1 trench measuring 9.8m by 1.6m, and 1 trench 2.2m long and 1.6m wide. The trenches typically revealed a sequence of 200mm deep topsoil overlying colluvial subsoil. No archaeological deposits and/or finds were identified. The trench evaluation constitutes a thorough examination of the site, with trenches positioned to provide a comprehensive sample of all available areas. No features, deposits or dating were found which would indicate significant archaeological activity within the evaluated area. The lack of pottery and lithics from the site, despite examination of spoil heaps, further indicates that the potential for significant archaeological survival is low. As a result, it was agreed with the DCHET that no further archaeological site work was necessary. This is the only report on these works.
2014
J Allan
M F R Steinmetzer
R Taylor
An archaeological evaluation was carried out by Oakford Archaeology at St Mary's Church, Ottery St Mary, Devon (SY 0985 9557), during July 2012. The work comprised the hand-excavation of a single trench totalling 5m in length and 0.8m wide. This was excavated in order to establish the archaeological potential of the area between the north transept tower and the choir vestry. The work exposed the tarred ceiling of a second underground chamber associated with the existing boiler room. The remains of a possible medieval wall foundation on the north side of the church were uncovered at the northern end of the trench. The level of truncation was such that no earlier features or deposits were found within the proposed development area. Fragments of medieval earthenware floor tiles, dating to 13th-15th century, were recovered from the disturbed soil. This included a type from the Normandy region of France not previously identified at St Mary's Church.
2012
M Steinmetzer
In December 2013 Oakford Archaeology were commissioned by SLR Consulting to undertake an archaeological evaluation at The Don Hatch Nursery, Combe Raleigh. The site lies within the historic core of Combe Raleigh, immediately to the east of the grade II* listed parish church of St Nicholas, while the northern boundary of the site lies less than 20m to the south of The Chantry, a grade I listed building dating to the 15th century. The work was therefore required by Devon County Historic Environment Team under a condition attached to the grant of planning permission. An archaeological evaluation was carried out prior to the start of groundworks. Two trenches, measuring 30m in total, were excavated, covering the roadside footprint of the proposed development. These revealed a simple sequence of topsoil over natural subsoil extending across the front of the site.
2013
M F R Steinmetzer
A second phase of archaeological trenching on land at Dainton Elms Cross, Ipplepen, Devon (SX 8473 6650), was carried out by Oakford Archaeology during June 2011. The work comprised the machine-excavation of 3 trenches totalling 53.2m in length. The trenches targeted a series of anomalies identified during the geophysical survey. Excavation revealed further sub-rectangular enclosures, and evidence for post buildings. Further elements of the Roman road were exposed; this was truncated by at least one undated burial. The finds included sherds of late Iron Age and 1st-2nd century Roman pottery, although a number of later wares indicate continued occupation of the site into the 4th century AD. The large number of features identified throughout the three trenches confirms that the survival of archaeological features is appreciably more extensive than was initially thought, especially along the eastern edge of the site. The full size and layout of the settlement is not known, although it is likely to extend beyond the site.
2012
M F R Steinmetzer
This report records the excavations undertaken by Oakford Archaeology in 2012 and 2015 of the moated manor house at North Hall, Widecombe-in-the-Moor, Devon. The work comprised the hand-excavation of seven trenches. Trenches 2, 4 and 6 exposed the remains of a substantial, though heavily robbed, stone building and were designed to provide further insight into the distribution and layout of the building or buildings and their relationship with the moat and defences. Trenches 3 and 5 provided complete cross-section across the earthen defences along the inner edge of the moat where they were best preserved, while Trench 7 targeted anomalies identified in the field to the north of the site. The finds recovered from the site contained a small quantity of mid-10th to early 13th century pottery, while large quantities of medieval coarsewares, dating to the 13th-15th century were recovered, including two sherds of Valencian lustreware, a 15th century high status import from western Spain. By the early post-medieval period the assemblage is dominated by local coarsewares from North Devon and the Low Country. By the mid-17th century these are replaced by English wares.
2016
M Steinmetzer
An archaeological evaluation was carried out by Oakford Archaeology at North Hall, Widecombe-in-the-Moor, Devon (SX 7184 7690), during July 2012. The work comprised the hand-excavation of three trenches totalling 54m in length and 1m wide. The trenches targeted a series of anomalies identified during the geophysical survey. The works exposed the heavily robbed out remains of a single N-S aligned wall, while large areas of the interior where covered in small, loose stone rubble. No evidence for internal floors or external surfaces was uncovered and it is thought that the site was comprehensively robbed from the mid-17th century onwards. A single large postpit was identified underneath the rubble spread, possibly suggesting an earlier building phase. Excavations at the northern end of the site uncovered the remains of the robbed-out revetment wall lining the inside edge of the moat. Excavations at the western end of the site revealed at least two phases of earthen bank behind the moat. Evidence of a beamslot would suggest that the rear of the later bank would have had some kind of timber revetment. Five sherds from a possible 'North French Barrel Costrel', dating to the 13th-14th century, were recovered from the infilling of the beamslot behind the earthen bank. The finds recovered from the site contained large quantities of late 18th-19th century blue-and-white transfer print, as well as tobacco pipe stems and a number of plain bowls. Sixty-two sherds of medieval coarsewares, dating to the 13th-15th century were recovered, as well as two sherds of 'Valencian Lustre Ware'. This is a 15th century high status, good quality pottery from western Spain.
2012
 
Previous   Page 1 of 6   Next