Series: Wardell Armstrong Archaeology unpublished report series

Wardell Armstrong Archaeology and Cultural Heritage
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Primary Contact: Fiona Wooler email
Associated OrganisationWardell Armstrong Consulting Group
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Year of Publication (Start): 1995
Year of Publication (End): 2018
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F Wooler
A level 2 building survey of redundant properties on Botchergate in advance of proposed demolition prior to construction of new County Council offices. Research has indicated that the site was partly occupied by buildings by 1820, but had become fully developed by the mid 19th century. The buildings were seemingly occupied as lower status dwellings with courts to the rear. The frontages on Botchergate were utilised as retail properties certainly in the second half of the 19th century.
2015
M Stoakley
A watching brief was undertaken to monitor the excavation of groundworks and service trenches across the western part of the site. It revealed the foundations of a small below-ground structure such as a workshop, cellar or boiler room. The foundations comprised 20th century brick walls of post-1930s date. No archaeological remains were noted.
2012
F Wooler
A desk based assessment and Level 3 historic building survey was undertaken of a range of buildings on 1-3 South Henry Street, 149-159 Botchergate, and No. 1 Rydal Street, in advance of a proposed redevelopment which would involve the demolition of the standing buildings. The research has revealed that Botchergate has been a major route into Carlisle since the Roman period, with numerous cremations and burials having been discovered along its length. There is archaeological evidence for activity in the medieval period, behind the street frontage on the opposite side of Botchergate, but in close proximity to the site. The historic building survey has revealed that the buildings appear to date to the early-mid 19th century, and were constructed as single-room deep, two storey high. Some fireplace locations could be identified during the survey. No's 155-159 and No. 1 Rydal Street appear to have been constructed c.1824 as part of housing erected along Union Street (now Rydal Street)
2013
A Buschmann
Wardell Armstrong Archaeology was commissioned by Bartlett Management Co Ltd to prepare a Heritage Impact Assessment for 16-20 Nicholas Street, Chester (NGR: SJ 40285 66149) in support of a planning application for a redevelopment of the site for commercial hotel use. The statement consists of a desk-based consultation of sources relating to the historic town development and its architectural history and a site visit.
2017
D Churchill
Wardell Armstrong Archaeology was commissioned by High Quality Homes Ltd, to undertake an archaeological evaluation at 169 Newmarket Road, Ashton-under-Lyne, Greater Manchester (NGR SD 92687 00370). This work is associated with the proposed residential development on c.0.18ha of land to the rear of 169 Newmarket Road (Figure 1). The work is required as the site is adjacent to three listed buildings, Taunton Hall (SMR 957.1.0), Taunton Farm (SMR 957.1.1) and Taunton Hall Garden Wall (SMR 957.1.2), the presence of which was sufficient to identify the site as of archaeological interest. The archaeological evaluation was undertaken over two days between the 19th and 20th of May 2014. The evaluation involved the excavation of three trenches, totalling 71.04m2, equal to 4.2% of the development area. No archaeological remains were identified in the trenches.
2014
C Peters
R Buckley
The desk-based research has found that the development site lies within the medieval core of the town of Ulverston, on one of the important historic routes into the town, and that it retains the medieval tenement plot layout. The buildings on the site were modified between 1856 and 1891, and would have retained much of their earlier fabric, and are known to have dated to at least 1832, and probably earlier. In the late 19th century they were known as Albert Buildings and utilised by Ulverston Remnant Warehouse, liquidated in 1894 The watching brief at 2 Soutergate, Ulverston did not reach any archaeological or natural deposits beyond context (100).This deposit comprised of a made up layer that is likely to have been a levelling surface for the building that formerly stood on this location. Archaeological deposits associated with the historical use of the site, as recorded in the desk based assessment are potentially preserved below this levelling deposit. No finds were discovered during the course of the watching brief.
2015
C Peters
The proposed development site has remained relatively unchanged since the medieval period from when it was part of the lands of the North Cray Place Estate. From 1931, when estate lands were sold off in lots, the surrounding area became increasingly developed for housing. Part of the proposed development site was occupied by No. 20 St James Way from some date between 1940 and 1963, with the north-western part occupied by a tennis court. The south-western part of the site has remained largely undeveloped, despite the encroachment of housing estates to the west. There are no known archaeological remains within the proposed development area. However, the site lies within an archaeological priority area, and the potential for archaeological remains, particularly of the Iron Age/ Roman and post medieval periods, cannot be ruled out. The site also lies just outside a Conservation Area. The presence of the grade II listed wall forming the northern boundary of the proposed development site and historically linked to the former North Cray Estate and perhaps dating to Lancelot Brown's landscaping design, suggests that archaeological recording may be necessary prior to any changes within the proposed development site.
2016
S Duckworth
A rapid photographic survey was undertaken on land at 29-65 Garden Street, Sheffield in Feb 2007. All of the buildings on the site comprise factory premises of mid to late 20th century date and are typical of light industrial usage. The buildings display a variety of forms typical of small engineering concerns. Buildings 2 and 4 comprise single-storey light industrial units of the immediate pre-war period. Buildings 5 and 6 are standard examples of small industrial premises built in the decades after the war. Building 3 comprises a late 20th century design of warehouse structure with a simple portal frame, replaceable lightweight cladding, and a large loading bay door to facilitate the use of fork-lift pallet-handling.
2007
F Giecco
An archaeological excavation was carried out at 42-48 Scotch Street, Carlisle, Cumbria. Nine phases of activity were recorded on the site, from a prehistoric ground surface through to intense Roman activity, early medieval pitting, 14th century industrial kiln activity and a post-medieval well. A wealth of finds were recovered, including pottery, coins, animal bone, worked stone, CBM, iron and copper alloy.
2004
A Buschmann
Wardell Armstrong (WA) was commissioned by PKF Planning to undertake a programme of archaeological building recording of a converted barn at 5 and 6 Croft Street, Kirkby Stephen, Cumbria. The work was required as a condition of planning consent. The building recording covered the three storey barn, which has been converted into two residential properties.
2017
A Buschmann
Wardell Armstrong Archaeology was commissioned by Steeles of Worthing to prepare a Heritage Impact Assessment for 66 Rectory Gardens, Worthing (NGR TQ 14429 04537) in support of a planning application for a redevelopment of the site (AWDM/1492/14). The statement consists of a desk based consultation of sources relating to the historic town development and its architectural history and a site visit.
2016
F Wooler
A Level 2 building survey undertaken of a Grade II listed terraced house dating to the 1840s, undertaken prior to alterations to conversion to six flats. A rapid desk-based assessment revealed that the east side of Spencer Street was constructed between 1847 and 1851. A chronology of the occupants was possible through assessment of census returns, trade directories and various sources. The historic building survey revealed that the property was a nice example of a mid-19th century dwelling for a middle class family, who could afford to have servants. The floor plans remain essentially as constructed with a few alterations. A few original fittings were noted, for example coving, ceiling rose, staircase and possible some skirting boards.
2012
A Buschmann
Wardell Armstrong was commissioned by Whitebread PLC to prepare a Heritage Impact Assessment for land at the A39 roundabout, Bodieve Business Park, Wadebridge (NGR: SW 99958 73056) in support of a planning application for a redevelopment of the site. The statement consists of a desk based consultation of sources relating to the area's development and a site visit.
2017
D Churchill
Wardell Armstrong Archaeology were commissioned by Estates and Agency Ltd, to undertake a desk-based assessment and archaeological evaluation at Abbey Retail Park, Barking and Dagenham, London (NGR TQ 4390 8390). A pre-construction assessment of the presence, significance and intensity of potential archaeological deposits across the development site was established as a requirement with the case officer, Charles Sweeny. The work is required as the site lies nearby heritage designations of the scheduled remains of Barking Abbey and Barking town center conservation area and therefore, the redevelopment of the Abbey Retail Park, Barking has a high potential for disturbance to and removal of significant archaeological remains dating from the prehistoric period through to the medieval period during the redevelopment. The archaeological evaluation was undertaken over 21 days between the 11th March 2014 and 8th April 2014. The evaluation involved the excavation of 10 trenches, totalling 392.65m2, 1.64% of the development area. Possible archaeological remains were identified in Trenches 3 and 4b, in the form of truncated ditches on a broad east - west orientation. No dating evidence was recovered from the features, however a 13th - 14th Century AD date may be attributed to the ditches in Trench 4b as ceramic was recovered from a 19th century pit which truncated the ditch fills.
2014
F Wooler
An archaeological desk based assessment and site walkover of additional areas relating to the Network Mains pipeline in Cumbria
2016
S Thompson
Watching Brief during replacement of gas main along line of Hadrian's Wall around the Ainderby Road and Ollerton Drive areas. Groundworks consisted of open trenches and trial pits, exposing the current gas main and other services following the same line. All grondwork was excavated through previously disturbed ground and backfill. No archaeology was observed during the watching brief.
2012
S Vance
The archaeological evaluation was undertaken over five days between the 28th October - 1st November 2013. The evaluation involved the excavation of 5 trenches, totalling 108m2. Archaeological remains were identified in Trenches 1, 2, 3 and 5. A wall was observed within Trench 1 and a tile surface, threshold and wall were observed within Trench 3. The remains in Trenches 1 and 3 appeared to relate to the former post-medieval farmstead that occupied the site. Two pits were observed within Trench 2, post medieval pot was recovered from one. The function of the pits remains unknown but it is likely that they were associated with the farmstead. Two phases of building were observed within Trench 5 that were most likely the demolished remains of an extension of Grange Farm. Three pits were observed within Trench 5. The purpose of two of the pits remains unclear as no dating evidence was recovered. The third pit contained the remains of a cow that was likely disposed of from Grange Farm.
2013
S Vance
Wardell Armstrong Archaeology were commissioned by Atkinson Building Contractors to undertake an archaeological evaluation at Mostyn Hall, Penrith, Cumbria (NGR NY 5184 3006). This work follows a planning application (Planning Application No. 3/13/0239) for the construction of a residential development on the former site of the Greggs bakery. Cumbria County Council granted planning consent for the development on the condition an archaeological evaluation be undertaken. An archaeological desk-based assessment was produced for the site in 2009 (Strickland 2009). The work is required as the site lies on the edge of the medieval town of Penrith. An Augustinian Friary was recorded in Penrith near the site as early as 1299. The extent of the friary is not known, though it is believed to have lain on or near Friargate. It is possible that the Friary could extent south into the proposed development area. The archaeological evaluation was undertaken over 2 days between the 17th-18th of September 2013. The evaluation involved the excavation of four trenches, totalling 100.8m2, 2092m2 of the proposed development area. No archaeological remains were noted. As this archaeological evaluation was conducted as part of a condition in association with a new residential development, no further work is deemed necessary. However, given the high archaeological potential of the area, it is recommended that any future work be subject to a programme of archaeological investigation.
2013
K Horsley
Archaeological evaluation on land to the west of Common Road, Newton-le-Willows as part of a planning application for a housing development. Three trenches were excavated within a portion of the development area revealing below ground wall remains of the forming grandstand of Newton Common Racecourse.
2017
R May
There had been some development on the site by 1806, including a one room Sunday school at the eastern end of the proposed development area. The Sunday school was demolished and rebuilt in the 1870s as a parochial school on a much larger scale. The former school had been converted into a works, but retained much of its historic external features and was a building of significant historic character. [Au(abr)]
2005
 
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