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Dec-2014




OVERARCHING AGENDA THEMES#


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The published Research Assessment and Agenda defined a series of four overarching research themes and, within each of these, a number of sub-themes [1]. This useful scheme has been amplified here to take account of subsequent work and stakeholder comments, with further subdivision of certain themes and the addition of an environmental research theme. For ease of reference, these overarching research themes are presented here in a tabular format with indications of period correlations.

Period/Overarching themes Palaeolithic Mesolithic Neolithic to MBA LBA and Iron Age Romano-British Early Medieval High Medieval Post-Medieval Modern
Environment
Pleistocene and Holocene climatic change (as evidenced, for example, by palaeochannel deposits)
Potential impact of future climate change upon the environment and the historic environment resource
Changes in sea level, configuration of sea and land, drainage networks and spatial extent of wetlands
Submergence of Doggerland
The impact of human activity upon woodland clearance and other changes in the regional vegetation
The impact of human activity upon soil development and geomorphic processes (e.g. alluviation)
Exploitation and settlement of diverse ecological zones

Period/Overarching themes Palaeolithic Mesolithic Neolithic to MBA LBA and Iron Age Romano-British Early Medieval High Medieval Post-Medieval Modern
Settlement
Distribution, density and character of hunter-gatherer cave and open sites
Development of agriculturally-based settlement patterns
Growth of urban centres and settlement hierarchies
Relationships between town and country
Vernacular building traditions

Period/Overarching themes Palaeolithic Mesolithic Neolithic to MBA LBA and Iron Age Romano-British Early Medieval High Medieval Post-Medieval Modern
Food procurement strategies
Hunter-gatherer subsistence strategies and mobility patterns
Transition from hunter-gatherer to agricultural subsistence strategies
Developments in crop and animal husbandry and changes in diet and health
The Agricultural Revolution and the industrialisation of agriculture

Period/Overarching themes Palaeolithic Mesolithic Neolithic to MBA LBA and Iron Age Romano-British Early Medieval High Medieval Post-Medieval Modern
The rural landscape
The development of fields and field systems
The development of parks, gardens and estates
Systems of woodland management
Development of monastic estates and post-Dissolution developments

Period/Overarching themes Palaeolithic Mesolithic Neolithic to MBA LBA and Iron Age Romano-British Early Medieval High Medieval Post-Medieval Modern
Industry, craft and trade
Systems of artefact production and exchange (lithics, pottery, metals, etc)
The origins and development of the Industrial Revolution
Environmental impacts of industrialisation
Industrial building traditions

Period/Overarching themes Palaeolithic Mesolithic Neolithic to MBA LBA and Iron Age Romano-British Early Medieval High Medieval Post-Medieval Modern
Communications
The role of rivers as movement corridors, sources of power and socio-political boundaries
The role of coastwise routeways
Constructed routeways: wooden or brushwood trackways, roads, canals, tramways and railways
Riverine and maritime waterborne transport

Period/Overarching themes Palaeolithic Mesolithic Neolithic to MBA LBA and Iron Age Romano-British Early Medieval High Medieval Post-Medieval Modern
Social, religious and political structures
Development of prehistoric monument complexes
Development of funerary monuments and changing burial and memorial practices
Development and use of shrines, temples, churches, monasteries and other religious buildings
Development and use of defended sites (hillforts, castles, etc)
Battlefield and skirmish sites
Development of territorial and administrative (e.g. parish) boundaries
Social and religious building traditions
[#1] Cooper, N J 2006 'Cross-period research and the foundation of a research strategy' in The Archaeology of the East Midlands, 287-291
Canons Ashby, Northamptonshire: Elizabethan manor house, Augustinian priory church, medieval village earthworks and parkland features form just some of the elements of a landscape palimpsest preserving plentiful opportunities for the investigation of cross-period themes (© National Trust)
Image 7.1 Canons Ashby, Northamptonshire




COMMENTS#



Organisation
Trent & Peak Archaeology
Chapter sub-heading
Food procurement strategies
Chapter sub-heading
Industry, craft and trade

General Comments

A Research Framework for the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site has recently been published (Knight 2016). The project has been enabled by funding from Historic England and guided by a Core Management Team comprising David Knight (Trent & Peak Archaeology), Mark Suggitt (DVMWHS), Dave Barrett (Derbyshire County Council) and Paddy O'Hara (Historic England) with administrative support from Gwen Wilson (DVMWHS). The Derwent Valley Mills framework was modelled upon the East Midlands Historic Environment Research Framework and places emphasis on several overarching Research Themes relevant to both the Post-Medieval and Modern periods. These include:

Food procurement strategies

  • The Agricultural Revolution and the industrialisation of agriculture

Industry, Craft and Trade

  • The origins and development of the Industrial Revolution
  • Environmental impacts of industrialisation
  • Industrial building traditions

The Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site Research Framework is available online here

--Tina Roushannafas, 06-Feb-2018 16:00


Organisation
Trent & Peak Archaeology
Chapter sub-heading
Environment

General Comments

  • Potential impact of future climate change upon the environment and the historic environment resource

This Overarching Agenda Theme has been addressed by the Historic England funded project 'Future Climate and Environmental Change Within the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site' by David Knight and Andy Howard (2015) (available here). This project has brought together a range of historical, geomorphological and environmental datasets to examine environmental and geomorphological landscape transformations along a 24km stretch of the River Derwent. The project assesses the potential impact of these changes on the historic assets of the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site (DVMWHS) and its designated Buffer Zone. The outputs of the project have directly informed the developing Research Framework for DVMWHS- for example highlighting those mill complexes which are particularly vulnerable to increased fluvial erosion and will need tighter monitoring and management. The research findings and methodologies employed provide more general lessons for the management of historic assets in the light of future climate change that cross period boundaries.

--Tina Roushannafas, 06-Feb-2018 16:05

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  This page (revision-64) was last changed on 06-Feb-2018 16:09 by Tina Roushannafas