Cockpit Hill, Cullompton, Devon: Building Recording and Archaeological Observation (OASIS ID: acarchae2-271681)

AC Archaeology Ltd, 2019

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1053679
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AC Archaeology Ltd (2019) Cockpit Hill, Cullompton, Devon: Building Recording and Archaeological Observation (OASIS ID: acarchae2-271681) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1053679

Introduction

Cockpit Hill, Cullompton, Devon: Building Recording and Archaeological Observation (OASIS ID: acarchae2-271681)

Historic building recording and archaeological monitoring and recording was undertaken by AC archaeology during January 2017 and July 2018 at 8 Cockpit Hill, Cullompton, Devon (ST 0207 0704).

The archaeological monitoring of groundworks recorded the remains of part of a 16th to 18th century stone structure with associated cobbled surface. A separate but contemporary probable stone-built garderobe pit and a 19th century rubbish pit were also exposed. The building remains correspond well with part of a projecting rear range shown on a 1633 map of Cullompton, while the historic building recording demonstrated that part of the existing property was also of probable 17th century origin.

The historic building recording and historic map evidence showed that the site was partially re-developed during the late 19th century, with a new rear range, acting as a workshop, built on a different alignment to the original one. The finds recovered came predominantly from the garderobe and largely comprised sherds of post-medieval pottery dating from the 16th to the 18th centuries, but also fragments of clay tobacco pipes and the butchered bones of cattle and sheep.