Chesterton Farm Foul Water Pipeline, Hills Quarry Route, Siddington, Gloucestershire. Magnetometer Survey (OASIS ID: archaeol20-409203)

David Sabin, Kerry Donaldson, 2020

Data copyright © Kerry Donaldson, Archaeological Surveys Ltd, David Sabin unless otherwise stated

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
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https://doi.org/10.5284/1083522
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David Sabin, Kerry Donaldson (2020) Chesterton Farm Foul Water Pipeline, Hills Quarry Route, Siddington, Gloucestershire. Magnetometer Survey (OASIS ID: archaeol20-409203) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1083522

Introduction

Chesterton Farm Foul Water Pipeline, Hills Quarry Route, Siddington, Gloucestershire. Magnetometer Survey (OASIS ID: archaeol20-409203)

A geophysical survey, comprising detailed magnetometry, was carried out by Archaeological Surveys Ltd at the request of Cotswold Archaeology. The survey was undertaken along a 3.7km long corridor outlined for a new sewer pipe between Cirencester and the sewage treatment works near South Cerney. The results indicate the presence of quarrying within two areas in the northern part of the corridor which along with nearby pit-like anomalies, could be of archaeological potential. Evidence for more recent quarrying is also evident in the southern part of the pipeline route. Throughout the survey corridor, a number of short, weakly positive linear and discrete anomalies can be seen, but the majority lack a coherent morphology. In the central part of the survey corridor, within a dry valley, there are a number of discrete, pit-like responses, some of which appear in a line or ring. While such responses can relate to natural features, an anthropogenic origin should be considered. In the southern part of the survey corridor there are a number of positive responses, but it is not clear if they relate to natural or anthropogenic features.


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