The Plough Inn, Hathersage, Derbyshire: Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: archaeol5-329757)

Archaeological Research Services Ltd, 2019

Data copyright © Archaeological Research Services Ltd unless otherwise stated

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Creative Commons License


Archaeological Research Services Ltd logo

Primary contact

Archaeological Research Services Ltd
Angel House
Portland Square
Bakewell
DE45 1HB
UK
Tel: 01629 814540

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1051622
Sample Citation for this DOI

Archaeological Research Services Ltd (2019) The Plough Inn, Hathersage, Derbyshire: Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: archaeol5-329757) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1051622

Introduction

The Plough Inn, Hathersage, Derbyshire: Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: archaeol5-329757)

Archaeological Research Services Ltd (ARS) was commissioned by Elliot Emery to undertake an Archaeological Watching Brief at The Plough Inn, Hathersage, Derbyshire following conditioned consent for Planning Application. No. NP/DDD/1117/1180) for the development of the site.

The programme of archaeological works comprised an Archaeological Watching Brief during ground works associated with construction, landscaping, and drainage and service trenches.

Three archaeological features were encountered: The foundation for a drystone wall, a likely quarry pit for alluvial sand, and a probable pit with an unclear function. It is possible, but unlikely that this latter pit can be interpreted as part of the tail-race associated with a 17th century lead smelting complex known to have been present on site. Both pits are probably industrial in nature and may have related to, or have been part of, this industrial complex. Both pits went out of use and were backfilled, probably in the 19th century or the early 20th century. The drystone wall which was interpreted as the property boundary of the Plough Inn may have been erected at roughly the same time.