Wood Lane, Offsite Developer Main, Binfield, Berkshire: Archaeological Observation (OASIS ID: borderar1-327750)

Border Archaeology, 2019

Data copyright © Border Archaeology unless otherwise stated

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Creative Commons License


Border Archaeology logo

Primary contact

Border Archaeology
The Plaza
Owen Way
Leominster Enterprise Park
Leominster
HR6 0LA
UK

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1052205
Sample Citation for this DOI

Border Archaeology (2019) Wood Lane, Offsite Developer Main, Binfield, Berkshire: Archaeological Observation (OASIS ID: borderar1-327750) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1052205

Introduction

Wood Lane, Offsite Developer Main, Binfield, Berkshire: Archaeological Observation (OASIS ID: borderar1-327750)

Border Archaeology was instructed by South East Water to undertake Archaeological Observation (excluding that portion of the route immediately E of the golf driving range) of engineering groundworks in connection with the Wood Lane Offsite Developer Main Wood Lane at Binfield, Bracknell Forest, Berkshire (NGR: SU 85024 69954 to NGR: SU 84904 70610).

Groundworks were carried out under archaeological supervision with material removed in level spits using a backacting toothless bucket down to the first significant archaeological horizon or to engineering depth, whichever was encountered first. The engineering groundworks combined direct drilling and open-cut trenching across agricultural land. Where access pits were excavated to allow for directional drilling, a depth of 1.20m was not exceeded.

No features of archaeological significance were uncovered. The only notable feature was a modern waste pit, filled with modern CBM and ceramics.