21 Querns Lane, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, Archaeological Evaluation, (OASIS ID: cotswold2-303944)

Cotswold Archaeology, 2019

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1050897
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Cotswold Archaeology (2019) 21 Querns Lane, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, Archaeological Evaluation, (OASIS ID: cotswold2-303944) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1050897

Introduction

21 Querns Lane, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, Archaeological Evaluation, (OASIS ID: cotswold2-303944)

In March 2018 Cotswold Archaeology carried out an archaeological evaluation at 21 Querns Lane, Cirencester, Gloucestershire. Archaeological interest in the site arises primarily from its location within the Roman civitas capital of Corinium Dobunnorum, parts of which are protected as a Scheduled Monument.

The fieldwork comprised three excavation trenches and demonstrated that Roman demolition debris survived in Trenches 1 and 2. A wall of possible later Roman (2nd to 4th-century AD) date, seemingly representing part of a low-status building or boundary, was identified in Trench 2. Evidence of post-Roman, possibly medieval, activity was represented by a robber trench targeting the Roman wall identified in Trench 2. Two deposits, observed sealing the identified Roman/post-Roman features/deposits in Trenches 1 and 2, have been interpreted as ‘dark earth’ or cultivation soils. The recovery of a sherd of mid 16th to 18th-century pottery from one of these deposits suggests that they were subject to disturbance during the post-medieval period. Exclusively modern deposits were identified in Trench 3.