Derbyshire Archaeological Journal

Derbyshire Archaeological Society, 2016 (updated 2019)

Data copyright © Derbyshire Archaeological Society unless otherwise stated

This work is licensed under the ADS Terms of Use and Access.
Creative Commons License


Derbyshire Archaeological Society logo

Primary contact

Susan Peberdy
Secretary
Derbyshire Archaeological Society

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1038992
Sample Citation for this DOI

Derbyshire Archaeological Society (2019) Derbyshire Archaeological Journal [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1038992

Derbyshire Archaeological Journal (2014), Volume 134.


Table of Contents

Contents
- (pp. )
PDF 2 Mb
Walking the Furrows: A Lithics Transect across the Peak
Barnatt. J. & Edmonds, M (pp. 001-077)
Abstract

Abstract

Walking the Furrows: A Lithics Transect across the Peak
Barnatt. J. & Edmonds, M (pp. 001-077)

This paper describes an exercise in field walking to collect prehistoric lithics, undertaken in 1983-85 and 1997-2003 within a Transect designed to sample three of the main topographic zones of the Peak District. Walking was designed for systematic coverage of ploughed surfaces, with individual find spots normally recorded, so that assemblages from field to field could be compared while keeping biases in results to a minimum. In total 136 fields were walked within the Transect, including seven in 1983-84 undertaken as part of parish surveys. Altogether just over 400 hectares of ground was walked.

PDF 37 Mb
Prehistoric Rock Art, Dobb Edge, Baslow
Barnatt. J. (pp. 078-080)
Abstract

Abstract

Prehistoric Rock Art, Dobb Edge, Baslow
Barnatt. J. (pp. 078-080)

This good example of rock art was brought to this author's attention late in 2012. It lies on a gritstone slab on flat, boulder-strewn, land at the crest of Dobb Edge. This ground, at the top of the main Eastern Moors western shelf, is high above the northern end of Chatsworth Park and has been part of the Chatsworth Estate since the early l9th century when land in Baslow was exchanged with the Duke of Rutland. The motif still relatively clear, if somewhat worn, is pecked into the rock and comprises three carefully formed concentric rings around a small central dot, with a groove or gutter running from the centre to the outside. The outer ring has an external diameter of 230-240mm. The whole is on the slightly raised crest of a small horizontal earthfast, with only part of the undulating face visible.. Until recent years the carving had probably long been buried, as is commonly the case in the Peak, and may well be why it survived through to today. This new discovery reinforces this point and reminds us there are presumably more examples that will sooner or later emerge from the tens of thousands of buried boulders in the region.

PDF 1 Mb
Excavation of Two Round Barrows on Longstone Edge, Derbyshire
Last, Jonathan (pp. 081-172)
Abstract

Abstract

Excavation of Two Round Barrows on Longstone Edge, Derbyshire
Last, Jonathan (pp. 081-172)

This paper reports on the excavation of two adjacent Peak District barrows with very different histories. Barrow One exhibited several phases of use in the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age, and was reused in later prehistory and the Romano-British period. The earliest human remains, which date to the 4th millennium cal. BC, comprise some crushed bone on the land surface beneath the barrow mound. The form of the site in the Neolithic is unclear but it is possible that a low ring-cairn pre-dates the mound into which it was incorporated and belongs to the initial mortuary phase. Also pre-dating the main barrow mound is a cist grave containing disturbed remains of two individuals and fragments of a Beaker pot.

PDF 44 Mb
Archaeological Investigations at Bakewell Churchyard and Hassop Road
Mora-Ottomano, A (pp. 173-196)
Abstract

Abstract

Archaeological Investigations at Bakewell Churchyard and Hassop Road
Mora-Ottomano, A (pp. 173-196)

An excavation around the base of the high cross in the churchyard of All Saint's Church, Bakewell, revealed the base of the socket stone that supports the cross shaft with archaeological features and deposits running below the stone, including a foundation wall orientated east to west. The remains of a burial identified beneath the foundation wall comprised an adult female apparently carrying a neonate child, suggesting that they both died in childbirth and were buried together. The skeletal remains of the adult were and yielded a date of cal. AD 1030 - 1210. This medieval date for the inhumation provides a terminus post quem for the wall foundation, which in turn underlies the cross base indicating, therefore, that the cross shaft is not in its original position but has been brought in at a later time.

PDF 12 Mb
The wardship and marriage of Robert Barley, first husband of "Bess of Hardwick"
Kilburn, T. (pp. 197-203)
Abstract

Abstract

The wardship and marriage of Robert Barley, first husband of "Bess of Hardwick"
Kilburn, T. (pp. 197-203)

In 2010 Philip Riden published an account of the Hardwick family of Hardwick Hall during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. One of the questions he examined was the first of the four marriages of Elizabeth Hardwick, better known to history as 'Bess of Hardwick'. Riden showed that much of the traditional account of how Bess met her first husband, Robert Barley, is fanciful. David Durant repeated the same account but was the first to suggest that Robert's marriage to Bess was an arrangement made to mitigate the impact of wardship on the Barley family. Robert's father, Arthur Barley, had substantial debts even before he entered into his inheritance on the death of his father, another Robert, in 1533. For example, a writ was issued against him in November 1530 for the sum of £100 which he owed to James Daniel, a London merchant-taylor.3 It is possible that such debts led him to sell Robert's marriage and wardship in the 1530s rather than any pressing need to stave off the Court of Wards. Sometime between 1533 and 1538 Arthur sold Robert's wardship and marriage to Bess's stepfather, Ralph Leche. At some date no later than 1538 Henry Marmion, a close associate of the Hardwick family, claimed that Ralph had sold Robert's marriage and wardship to him. After Arthur's death, his lands at Barley Lees were deemed to be held by knight service to the king which led to Godfrey Boswell's purchase of Robert's wardship. Robert was aged 13 when his father died on 28 May 1543. The exact date of Robert's marriage to Bess is not known though it is thought to have taken place in the spring of that year. If so, it was destined to be of short duration since Robert died in December 1544.

PDF 4 Mb
A Hardwick scandal of the early Seventeenth Century: William Cavendish, Lady Arbella Stuart, and the case of Margaret Chatterton
Raylor, T. (pp. 204-220)
Abstract

Abstract

A Hardwick scandal of the early Seventeenth Century: William Cavendish, Lady Arbella Stuart, and the case of Margaret Chatterton
Raylor, T. (pp. 204-220)

The wedding of William Cavendish, later 2nd earl of Devonshire, to Christian Bruce in the Rolls Chapel on 10 April 1608 took almost everyone by surprise. It was arranged hastily and in secret. Rumour had it that the young man had objected to the match-to a mere girl of twelve-until threatened by his domineering, hard-headed father with the loss of £100,000.1 Even the boy's close relatives then at court-his uncle, Henry, and his cousin, Lady Arbella Stuart-were only invited by Lord Cavendish to attend the wedding supper after the ceremony was concluded. Lord Cavendish gave as his reason for not previously acquainting his brother with the marriage plans that 'he had great Enemies', who might, had the matter been made public, have sought to cross him.

PDF 10 Mb
The Butterley Gangroad
Griffin, T. Bunting, D. & Key, B. (pp. 221-252)
Abstract

Abstract

The Butterley Gangroad
Griffin, T. Bunting, D. & Key, B. (pp. 221-252)

Canals became the favoured mode for moving heavy goods during the eighteenth century and railways captured most of this traffic during the nineteenth century. There was a transition period during which primitive railways were built as feeders to canals and sometimes as a means of linking them together. This combined transport system greatly extended the catchment area of inland waterways and also provided a 'test bed" for the development of railway technology. This transition was very important in Derbyshire. In 1839 the first public steam railway to serve the county was opened between Derby and Nottingham, but before then the Cromford and High Peak Railway provided a north/south transport route right across Derbyshire by linking canals. The Cromford Canal was already linked to Mansfield in Nottinghamshire by means of the Mansfield and Pinxton Railway and it also had around 30 railway branches linking it to coal mines, quarries, ironworks, etc .Traction on all of these early railways was provided by horses, gravity or by means of stationary steam engines via ropes or cables.

PDF 16 Mb
Index
- (pp. )
PDF 1 Mb

ADS logo
Data Org logo
University of York logo