North-east wing, Thornton Hall, Thornton-le-Dale, North Yorkshire. Building Recording (OASIS ID: eddennis1-369264)

Ed Dennison, 2020

Data copyright © Ed Dennison unless otherwise stated

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1083487
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Ed Dennison (2020) North-east wing, Thornton Hall, Thornton-le-Dale, North Yorkshire. Building Recording (OASIS ID: eddennis1-369264) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1083487

Introduction

North-east wing, Thornton Hall, Thornton-le-Dale, North Yorkshire. Building Recording (OASIS ID: eddennis1-369264)

Pre-intervention recording and watching brief during conversion of building to expand residential care home.

The historic building recording has shown that the north-east wing was purpose-built as a service wing, its main function being to house the kitchen associated with The Hall. The Listed Building description states that the wing was built in the late 18th century, but it must have been present by 1747-48 when documents record substantial alterations rather than a new build, and it may even have been built by the beginning of the 1740s. However, it does not appear to have been built in c.1719-20 when Samuel Buck sketched the north side of The Hall. The current evidence suggests that it was most probably constructed towards the end of the period c.1720 to 1740, either by John Hill II (1654-1738) or John Hill III (c.1689-1753). A limited number of probable mid-later 18th century fittings, including door surrounds and window shutters, survived to the northern part of the ground floor at the time of the recording to substantiate this. The creation of an impressive ‘Georgian’ facade to the most prominent (east) external elevation, which incorporates several blind windows and a formerly pedimented doorway, is noteworthy.


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