Excavations and Building recording at Polsloe Priory (St Katherine's Priory), Exeter, 1976-79 and 1991 (Exeter archive site 59)

Exeter City Council, Cotswold Archaeology, 2015

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Exeter City Council, Cotswold Archaeology (2015) Excavations and Building recording at Polsloe Priory (St Katherine's Priory), Exeter, 1976-79 and 1991 (Exeter archive site 59) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1035196

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Introduction

Excavations and Building recording at Polsloe Priory (St Katherine's Priory), Exeter, 1976-79 and 1991  (Exeter archive site 59)

Excavations in 1976-78 uncovered a sequence of buildings including:

  • Robbed wall trenches of a building, perhaps a temporary chapel, preceding the construction of the church nave.
  • The church foundations, up to 3 metres wide, showing the church to be long and narrow (c 39x9 metres), without aisle or transept on the south side and apparently remaining unchanged in plan throughout the life of the priory. The first refectory and east range were built on modest scale and it appears that the first chapter house did not project beyond the east range.
  • A detached kitchen, aligned north-west to south-east, and a small room containing a well were built south of the west range.
  • Further rooms, linked by a corridor to the refectory were added next to the kitchen. Small timber buildings later occupied part of the 'garden' area.
  • The kitchen and corridor were demolished and the adjacent rooms altered internally. A large rectangular building (c11x18 metres) with narrow stone footings in the former 'garden'.
  • The first west range was replaced by the standing building. A new refectory, kitchen and cloister also appear to have been built at this time.
  • A room was added to the new kitchen range and another further east.
  • The added rooms were demolished. A sunken rectangular 'cistern' with ashlar floor and walls were constructed; stairs led down on its east side and water was fed to it by earthenware pipes.
  • The area south of the refectory was covered by a large deposit of animal bones, apparently butchery waste.
  • The west range was retained after the dissolution; all other buildings were thoroughly robbed.