Smouha District, Alexandria, Egypt: Report on geophysical survey, November 2004

Sally-Ann Ashton, 2007

Data copyright © Dr Sally-Ann Ashton unless otherwise stated

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Sally-Ann Ashton (2007) Smouha District, Alexandria, Egypt: Report on geophysical survey, November 2004 [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000020

Introduction

The Port Authority Bus Depot with electromagnetic survey in progress

A geophysical survey was conducted over the suspected site of the remains of the sanctuary temple complex in the ancient district of Hadra, now the heavily developed Smouha district of Alexandria, Egypt. The location of the site was estimated from historic map regression that was tested in three key-hole areas of open ground where access for geophysical survey could be obtained, the Port Authority Bus depot, the Elabrahimia school for girls and the Ashraf el Khagha primary school. Both ground penetrating radar (GPR) and electromagnetic survey were used for the survey and identified a number of subsurface anomalies. Unfortunately, due to the limited area of open space available few of the anomalies were fully described by the survey and some may be discounted due to modern intervention such as the presence of buried services. The archaeological significance of the results is unclear and requires confirmation through invasive investigation to ascertain the full significance of the identified anomalies.

This project was completed with the aid of a grant from the British Academy and the Seven Pillars of Wisdom.