Old Grammar School, Bromyard, Herefordshire. Historic Building Recording (OASIS ID: headland3-371607)

Headland Archaeology Ltd, 2019

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1057523
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Headland Archaeology Ltd (2019) Old Grammar School, Bromyard, Herefordshire. Historic Building Recording (OASIS ID: headland3-371607) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1057523

Introduction

Old Grammar School, Bromyard, Herefordshire. Historic Building Recording (OASIS ID: headland3-371607)

Headland Archaeology was commissioned, by Hydro-Logic Self-Administered Pension Fund (the client), through their agent, Hook Mason Consulting, to undertake Historic Building recording of buildings associated with the Old Grammar School, Bromyard, Herefordshire. Recording was undertaken at the site prior to redevelopment and conversion of the buildings to residential properties. The survey revealed four phases of development of the structure which Historic mapping suggested the earliest phase dated from 1835. Later development occurred during the Victorian and Modern periods.

Little of the original internal fabric, relating to the building's function as a school remained, modern redevelopment as commercial offices having masked or swept this away. Roofing timbers and frames did survive, with the 1st phase of development suggestion a relatively early post-medieval origin.