Medieval Britain and Ireland

Society for Medieval Archaeology, 2008. (updated 2021) https://doi.org/10.5284/1000424. How to cite using this DOI

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Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1000424
Sample Citation for this DOI

Society for Medieval Archaeology (2021) Medieval Britain and Ireland [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000424

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KENILWORTH, KENILWORTH CASTLE

County Warwickshire
Country England
Grid reference SP 279 722
Contractor Warwickshire Museum
Submission year 2007
Volume number 52
Index number 232
Text Observation of reflooring of the N. part of Leicester's Stables was carried out by B. Gethin and P. Thompson for English Heritage. The general stripping did not penetrate down to the remains seen to the south in 2006, but an E.-W. service trench across the N. part of the building showed that a considerable depth of archaeological deposits survived below, including the probably 16th-century drains previously excavated. The existing inner face of the curtain wall at the N. end was shown to be a widening, perhaps associated with Leicester's work on the stables and perhaps with the internal stone buttresses inserted to support an upper floor. A gas pipe trench was also observed which ran from the N. boundary of the castle, east of the Gatehouse to the N. end of the stables. The curtain wall was exposed at two places on its expected alignment at a very shallow depth. A short distance south was another, parallel wall, almost certainly part of a medieval building backing on to it. It is just possible that this might be part of the ‘constabulls lodging', referred to in a survey of c. 1563, as this is one of the very few places within the outer court where it could have fitted. A further sandstone feature, possibly a drain, just to the south was probably associated with it. To the south were layers containing 13th- to 15th-century pottery and 15th/16th-century pottery, tile and carved stone; to the south of these was a sandstone feature, possibly yet another medieval wall foundation. Recording of the disturbance caused by a fallen tree on the NE. side of the Tiltyard Dam by C. Jones revealed two phases of foundations for the E. wall cut into the top of the dam make up. The earlier foundation, which was possibly medieval or 16th-century, was fairly insubstantial; the later which may have been late 16th-century, contained reused masonry, although it had probably been rebuilt during consolidation in the 1960s.
Keywords (post-conquest) castles
ceramics (pottery, tiles)
stone, architectural

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