Medieval Britain and Ireland

Society for Medieval Archaeology, 2008. (updated 2021) https://doi.org/10.5284/1000424. How to cite using this DOI

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Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1000424
Sample Citation for this DOI

Society for Medieval Archaeology (2021) Medieval Britain and Ireland [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000424

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SOCKBURN, SOCKBURN HALL

County Durham
Country England
Grid reference NZ 350 070
Contractor English Heritage
Submission year 2007
Volume number 52
Index number 55
Text D. Went and M. Jecock undertook a detailed landscape survey of the parkland around Sockburn Hall, located near the base of a pendulous loop in the River Tees south of Darlington; geophysical surveys were also commissioned from GSB Prospection Ltd. Sockburn is mentioned as the location of episcopal consecrations in the late 8th century and is renowned for the exceptional collection of Viking cross-shafts and hogbacks now housed within the pre-Conquest church, the ruins of which stand centrally within the park. The estate was granted to the ecclesiastical community at Durham around 1000 A.D., and later became the seat of the Conyers family, one of the most powerful baronies in the County Palatine. The principal discoveries relate to the location of the Conyers' 16th/17th-century mansion, demolished in the 18th century, plus its attendant gardens, while a partly moated enclosure, open in the direction of the church, may mark the site of the mansion's medieval precursor described in 15th-century documents. No earthwork evidence was found for Anglian or Viking activity, although the Anglian ecclesiastical settlement must lie adjacent to the ruined church. There may have been multiple Viking polities: one based on the former church estate, and another drawn by the trading opportunities offered by an adjacent crossing point of the river (the ‘Sockburn Wath') and strand.
Keywords (pre-conquest) area survey
Keywords (post-conquest) manors and moated sites
waterworks (conduits, dams, drains, ponds, tanks)
Publications EH Research Department Report Series 82-2007
References OASIS: englishh2-67601 [link to grey literature report]

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