An Archaeological Evaluation of the Old Priory buildings, Leominster: Saxon, Medieval and later discoveries

Bruce Watson, 2020

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Bruce Watson (2020) An Archaeological Evaluation of the Old Priory buildings, Leominster: Saxon, Medieval and later discoveries [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1059300

Introduction

An Archaeological Evaluation of the Old Priory buildings, Leominster: Saxon, Medieval and later discoveries

In 2005 the Friends of Leominster Priory organised an archaeological evaluation of the car park occupying the site of the cloisters of Leominster Priory (est. 1123), which were located to the north of the church. The primary purpose of this project was to investigate and date a circular structure identified by a ground penetrating radar survey (which proved to be modern). Three radiocarbon data of cal AD 655-730, cal AD 655-775 and cal AD 772-900 were obtained from bone samples from the initial Saxon features, which makes this activity contemporary with the documented foundation of a church/monastery in c. AD 660 by St Edfrith. The wide variety of faunal material present included the major domesticated species plus birds and fish, confirming that this area was used for rubbish disposal. The three phases of the western arm of the priory cloisters were located. The final phase of the cloister walkway was found to be of either late 14th or 15th century date. Part of a cellared masonry building attached to the western side of the cloister walkway was excavated. After the suppression of the priory in 1539, the cloisters were demolished and then extensively quarried for building stone. During this phase of demolition the former cloister garth was used to sort salvaged material and 536 fragments of broken glazed floor tiles were discarded here.