Sussex Archaeological Collections: Relating to the history and antiquities of the counties of East and West Sussex

Sussex Archaeological Society, 2000 (updated 2019)

Data copyright © Sussex Archaeological Society unless otherwise stated

This work is licensed under the ADS Terms of Use and Access.
Creative Commons License


Sussex Archaeological Society logo

Primary contact

Luke Barber
Research Officer
Sussex Archaeological Society
Bull House
92 High Street
Lewes
BN7 1XH

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1000334
Sample Citation for this DOI

Sussex Archaeological Society (2019) Sussex Archaeological Collections: Relating to the history and antiquities of the counties of East and West Sussex [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000334


Remembering 'Round-the-Down'
TOPOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVES ON EARLY SETTLEMENT AND LAND-USE AT SOUTHERHAM, NEAR LEWES

by Gail Vines & Frances Price

Archaeological and documentary evidence, taken together, suggests the enduring significance of a subtle downland feature on the steep southern slope of the Malling-Caburn Downs. Named 'Round-the-Down' on the 1873 Ordnance Survey map, this small rounded hill is one of the few local landforms still noted by today's cartographers. The site of an Early-Bronze-Age barrow constructed alongside prehistoric fields, it retained a distinct identity well beyond prehistoric times. Within the settlement of Southerham, throughout the rise and fall of a peasant community, it became the focal point of a common field and a network of trackways, traces of which remain today. Thus the barrow and its hill may have helped to define a landscape that remained in cultivation over four millennia.

<< back