Sidmouth Church of St Giles and St Nicholas, Sidmouth, Devon. Results of an Archaeological Monitoring and Recording. (OASIS ID: southwes1-204395)

South West Archaeology Ltd, 2018

Data copyright © South West Archaeology Ltd unless otherwise stated

This work is licensed under the ADS Terms of Use and Access.
Creative Commons License


South West Archaeology Ltd logo

Primary contact

Dr Samuel Walls
South West Archaeology Ltd
The Old Dairy
Hacche Lane Business Park
South Molton
Devon
EX36 3LH
UK

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1050109
Sample Citation for this DOI

South West Archaeology Ltd (2018) Sidmouth Church of St Giles and St Nicholas, Sidmouth, Devon. Results of an Archaeological Monitoring and Recording. (OASIS ID: southwes1-204395) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1050109

Introduction

Sidmouth Church of St Giles and St Nicholas, Sidmouth, Devon. Results of an Archaeological Monitoring and Recording. (OASIS ID: southwes1-204395)

This report and image collection presents the results of an archaeological monitoring and recording project, carried out by South West Archaeology Ltd. (SWARCH), at the Church of St Giles and St Nicholas, Sidmouth, Devon during ground works associated with an extension for welfare purposes on the north side of the tower and improved and associated drainage.

A substantial amount of ground disturbance had occurred through the 19th and 20th centuries. Similarities of foundations in the north aisle to earlier identified interior foundations may indicate that the original c.14th century north aisle was longer than originally thought and indicates that the foundations were reused when the north aisle was rebuilt in the late 19th century. Graves that pre-date the 15th-century builds of the church appear to be on a more north-east by south-west alignment compared to the later burials, which include late 18th-mid 19th century 'barrel tombs'. These tombs are associated with weathered plaques on the north-west buttress of the tower (transcripts of the inscriptions are held by the church). Similar examples were uncovered in earlier excavations within the church. As discovered in the south transept in earlier archaeological work, infant burials are associated by close proximity to the structure of the church with at least one intact example by the north aisle and another of re-deposited remains against the tower.

Other than the northern section of the footing trench, the new extension to the church will leave archaeological features intact as the level of formation was within made-ground layers or on the horizon with the buried subsoil. The arched tops of the 'barrel tombs' were removed and the tombs capped over, leaving the remains within undisturbed.