Surrey Archaeological Collections

Surrey Archaeological Society, 2003 (updated 2016)

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Surrey Archaeological Society (2016) Surrey Archaeological Collections [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000221

Burpham: Excavation in 1978

M G O’CONNELL

This is a short report on the excavation undertaken at Burpham during the spring and summer of 1978 in advance of the construction of the Burpham–Ladymead Diversion which now forms part of the London–Portsmouth Trunk Road (A3). A full report is to be found in Microfiche. Because aerial coverage of the area and geographical surveying together with fieldwalking all produced inconclusive results, a series of exploratory trenches were opened by machine along the course of the projected A3. On the basis of the finds from the area investigated it seems likely that some form of Late Bronze Age/Early Iron Age settlement existed on the brow or top of the high ground and that material from that settlement has been washed down the hillside by the natural process of weathering and soil drift, accelerated at various periods by plough action. The existence of such a hilltop settlement perhaps with a defensive earthwork might explain the place-name evidence and is so far the only explanation that can be offered.

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