Surrey Archaeological Collections

Surrey Archaeological Society, 2003 (updated 2016)

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1000221
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Surrey Archaeological Society (2016) Surrey Archaeological Collections [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000221

William Talman and a supposed project to improve Hampton Court

ROWLAND G M BAKER

In 1951 Mr Cyril Bunt, then the curator of prints and drawings at the Royal Institute of British Architects, published a paper describing a volume of original drawings from the Institute’s library, one of their first acquisitions, and one which had lain dormant for many years until Mr Bunt brought it to light. The major part of the book consists of a set of drawings for a splendid estate on the Surrey side of the Thames, opposite Hampton Court, and situated somewhere on the boundary between Long Ditton and Kingston upon Thames. The architect was William Talman (1650-1719), Comptroller of Works to William III, and the drawings are thought to date from the last decade of the 17th century, when Talman was actively engaged in the supervision of the building operations at Hampton Court Palace. The volume also contains a number of other drawings mostly by Talman’s son John, which had been inserted at a later date.

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