Surrey Archaeological Collections

Surrey Archaeological Society, 2003 (updated 2016)

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1000221
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Surrey Archaeological Society (2016) Surrey Archaeological Collections [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000221

Excavations at Lagham Manor, South Godstone, Surrey (TQ 364 481)

LESLEY L KETTERINGHAM

This report describes five years’ work at Lagham Manor between 1973 and 1978 by the Bourne Society Archaeological Group directed by the writer. The object was to discover the original medieval buildings excluding the house itself which almost certainly lies beneath the front lawn of the present house. The owner, the Hon Mrs D C R MacNeile Dixon, gave permission to dig in nearly all the rest of the land enclosed by the moat. The earthwork, a moat, is a scheduled Ancient Monument and the present 17th century house is a Listed Building Grade II. Permission to excavate was received from the Department for the Environment provided that the moat itself was not disturbed. Footings of outbuildings dated 13th-14th century, possibly a bakehouse and brewery, have been discovered, also those of a large barn probably dated to the late 12th or early 13th century. Pottery from all periods since then represents the later development of the site. Owing to the size of the area a limited amount only has been dug. This paper should be regarded as an interim report.

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