St Mary's Primary School, Ascupart Street, Southampton. Archaeological Evaluation (SOU1565) (OASIS ID: wessexar1-110217)

Wessex Archaeology, 2019

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1056108
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Wessex Archaeology (2019) St Mary's Primary School, Ascupart Street, Southampton. Archaeological Evaluation (SOU1565) (OASIS ID: wessexar1-110217) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1056108

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Introduction

St Mary's Primary School, Ascupart Street, Southampton. Archaeological Evaluation (SOU1565) (OASIS ID: wessexar1-110217)

Wessex Archaeology was commissioned by Groundwork Solent to undertake an archaeological evaluation in advance of development within the school playing fields at St Marys Primary School, Ascupart Street, Southampton. The evaluation consisted of the mechanical excavation of eight trenches located within the proposed footprint of a Multi-Use Games Area. The work was intended to assess the archaeological potential, and to inform the extent and nature of any further archaeological mitigation which may be necessary in this area of high archaeological potential.

The trenches positioned in the south-western corner of the development area revealed extensive post-medieval and modern disturbance, presumably associated with the construction and realignment of the railway line which previously ran through the site of the playing fields. Three of the remaining trenches each contained a large pit of middle Saxon date. Although hand excavation of the features was limited due to the depth of overburden (up to 1.2m), augering of the pits confirmed the features survive to depths ranging from 1.2-2.3m. Earlier archaeological investigations in the immediate vicinity have identified similar features which have been interpreted as localised brickearth quarry pits, later used for the disposal of rubbish.