Land adjacent to Southampton Solent University, Southampton. Archaeological Watching Brief (SOU1664) (OASIS ID: wessexar1-251210)

Wessex Archaeology, 2019

Data copyright © Wessex Archaeology unless otherwise stated

This work is licensed under the ADS Terms of Use and Access.
Creative Commons License


Southampton Solent University logo
Interserve logo
Wessex Archaeology logo

Primary contact

Wessex Archaeology
Portway House
Old Sarum Park
Salisbury
SP4 6EB
UK
Tel: 01722 326867
Fax: 01722 337562

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1056093
Sample Citation for this DOI

Wessex Archaeology (2019) Land adjacent to Southampton Solent University, Southampton. Archaeological Watching Brief (SOU1664) (OASIS ID: wessexar1-251210) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1056093

Introduction

Land adjacent to Southampton Solent University, Southampton. Archaeological Watching Brief (SOU1664) (OASIS ID: wessexar1-251210)

Wessex Archaeology was commissioned by Interserve, on behalf of Southampton Solent University, to undertake an archaeological watching brief during the initial groundworks associated with the redevelopment of land adjacent to Southampton Solent University. A watching brief was required as a planning permission condition prior to the construction of a new five-seven story teaching building on the north side of the existing campus building.

The watching brief recorded no evidence of any significant archaeological features, deposits or finds beyond the survival of a shallow brick wall foundation and a shallow north/south orientated ditch which was located at the north-western edge of trench 9. The ditch was cut into the top of the brickearth natural and filled with abundant late 19th century china, pottery, bottle glass and slate fragments. The results have largely confirmed earlier test-pit observations made in 2012, which found a small number of ditches and boundary features and suggested that the former substantial town-house properties, which fronted on to East Park Terrace would have had a substantial impact to deposits of archaeological potential in this zone.