Holy Trinity Church, Edale, Derbyshire. Historic building recording (OASIS ID: wessexar1-362014)

Wessex Archaeology, 2019

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1058998
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Wessex Archaeology (2019) Holy Trinity Church, Edale, Derbyshire. Historic building recording (OASIS ID: wessexar1-362014) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1058998

Introduction

Holy Trinity Church, Edale, Derbyshire. Historic building recording (OASIS ID: wessexar1-362014)

Wessex Archaeology has been commissioned by Edale Parish Church to produce a historic building record relating to the proposed construction of a single-storey toilet extension adjacent to the South Porch of the Holy Trinity Church, Edale, Derbyshire.

The historic building recording has established that the Holy Trinity Church was built in 1885 as designed by architect William Dawes, Manchester. The primary construction included the South Porch. The tower and spire were completed four years later but formed part of the original design. This church was the third to be built in Edale. The first two stood across the road within the old graveyard. The first chapel was built in 1633 and the chapel was later rebuilt on the same site in 1812. Stone from the old chapel was used in the construction of the extant new church.

The historic building recording was successful in meeting its aims including the recommendations stipulated in the East Midlands research framework.