Farringdon Eastern Ticket Hall, Phase 2 Mitigation, Hayne Street (Crossrail XTE12)

Museum of London Archaeology, 2019

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1055112
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Museum of London Archaeology (2019) Farringdon Eastern Ticket Hall, Phase 2 Mitigation, Hayne Street (Crossrail XTE12) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1055112

Introduction

Farringdon Eastern Ticket Hall, Phase 2 Mitigation, Hayne Street (Crossrail XTE12)

A series of investigations were undertaken at the site of the new Farringdon Eastern Ticket Hall (ETH) and the surrounding streets between 2011 and 2013, culminating in a phase of excavation located in the north-east of the site. In addition two trenches were excavated within the gardens of Charterhouse Square in 2014, as part of a community project. The trench locations were informed by a Forensic Geophysical Survey produced by Keele University, and were restricted by root preservation orders. The interventions at the ETH uncovered a relatively complete sequence from natural deposits through to 20th-century features, although there were localised areas of complete truncation. A solitary medieval adult burial and a series of metalled surfaces were recorded within the gardens of Charterhouse, forming part of a sequence dating from the medieval period to the 20th century.