Category Archives: ADS Partners

ADS 3D Viewer

ADS 3D Viewer is a two year project funded under the ‘Marie Curie Actions’ Seventh Framework Programme, and benefits from the collaboration with the Italian Visual Computing Lab in the framework of the ARIADNE European project. In the past ten years the use of new technologies for the 3D documentation and reconstruction of cultural heritage has changed how we approach archaeological research.

The growth of information technology in 3D documentation tools, including electronic surveying instruments, laser scanners, photogrammetric cameras, and even CAD modellers, has brought an exponential increase in the use of digital data. The use of “real-time” survey software and hardware such as total stations, global positioning systems (GPS), photogrammetry and laser scanners has had a remarkable impact on archaeological recording as well as important implications for archaeological survey. The use of these techniques, by improving the accuracy and precision of the documentation process, is considerably changing the nature and implications of the word “digital” in archaeology. Presently, the main challenge for archaeologists and information and communication technology specialists consists in the preservation and dissemination of 3D data in archaeology. Up to now, a large number of 3D digital data archives have been produced and most focus on the preservation of the information over time without thinking about the accessibility of these data on the part of the scientific community.

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Blue/Black on Red Jar, ID 76449 in the ADS 3D viewer. © Egypt Exploration Society, Amarna Trust

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DADAISM Project

DADAISM

The DADAISM project brings together researchers from the diverse fields of archaeology, human computer interaction, image processing, image search and retrieval, and text mining to create a rich interactive system to address the problems of researchers finding images relevant to their research.

In the age of digital photography, thousands of images are taken of archaeological artefacts. These images could help archaeologists enormously in their tasks of classification and identification if they could be related to one another effectively. They would yield many new insights on a range of archaeological problems. However, these images are currently greatly underutilized for two key reasons. Firstly, the current paradigm for interaction with image collections is basic keyword search or, at best, simple faceted search. Secondly, even if these interactions are possible, the metadata related to the majority of images of archaeological artefacts is scarce in information relating to the content of the image and the nature of the artefact, and is time intensive to enter manually.
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ADS welcomes the NEARCH partners to York!

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​NEARCH partners enjoying a December hailstorm on their way to start the meeting in York.

ADS was delighted to host the NEARCH partners on 11-12 December, 2014 for both a plenary meeting, and the first of the NEARCH scientific sessions. As it was winter in the north of England, the partners first had to brave a hailstorm, lasting just the few minutes walk from their hotel to the meeting venue!

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Archaeological Drones

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are a ‘disruptive technology’, a technology that forces us to rethink how we do (or used to do) things – from protecting white rhino to delivering pizza. Everyone who needs a bird’s eye view is now wondering how this technology can help them; farmers, structural engineers, ecologists and, of course, archaeologists.

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Hexacopter equipped to take near-vertical photographs

In theory, even a very minor archaeological site can now benefit from its very own aerial survey. But while the possibilities for archaeology are immensely exciting, many of the actual results are still disappointing; blurry aerial photos, images which may be pretty but which can’t be georeferenced and expensive cameras hitting the ground at terminal velocity.

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Marie Curie post doctoral fellow Fabrizio Galeazzi joins ADS and the Centre for Digital Heritage

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Fabrizio 3D laser scanning at Las Cuevas site, Chiquibul Reserve (Belize).

This term ADS are pleased to welcome Fabrizio Galeazzi, a new Marie Curie post doctoral fellow, who will be working with us and the Centre for Digital Heritage.

Fabrizio comes to York having received a BA and MA in Archaeology at the University of Rome “La Sapienza”, specializing in Late Antiquity and Medieval Archaeology, and completing a Ph.D. in World Cultures/Heritage at the University of California, Merced. Fabrizio’s doctoral research investigated the potential use of 3D technologies for the analysis and interpretation of archaeological and heritage sites and how 3D documentation technologies, such as laser scanning and dense stereo matching techniques, are changing archaeological excavation practices.
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CAA 2014 Paris

The department of archaeology on rue Michelet, Paris
The impressive exterior of the department

The annual CAA (Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology) conference took place in the impressive surroundings of the Sorbonne. The Archaeology Data Service and Internet Archaeology were very well represented throughout the 4 days of the conference.

 

Day One 22nd April 2014

Partners from the ARIADNE project came together in Paris in the ARIADNE Workshop on On-line Resources chaired by ADS’s Catherine Hardman. The workshop introduced archaeological researchers to a variety of on-line data resources, including those held by the three partners providing on-line access to their data as part of the EC Infrastructures funded Advanced Research Infrastructure for Archaeological Dataset Networking (ARIADNE) project.

The partners were the Archaeology Data Service (ADS), ARACHNE at the German Archaeological Institute (DAI), and Fasti Online at the International Association of Classical Archaeology (AIAC). In addition to the ARIADNE partners, the workshop featured a presentation on data and data integration in the Digital Archaeological Record (tDAR). tDAR is an international digital repository based in America for the digital records of archaeological investigations.

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The Value and Impact of the Archaeology Data Service: Final Report

The final report of the coequally known ‘ADS IMPACT project’, reported upon previously in this blog, is now available to download from the Jisc website. 

The Value and Impact of the Archaeology Data Service (ADS): a study and methods for enhancing sustainability was commissioned by Jisc as part of a larger study into the the value and impact of three data centres (ADS, BADC and ESDS). These assessments were undertake by Neil Beagrie of Charles Beagrie Ltd and Professor John Houghton of the Centre for Strategic Economic Studies (CSES) and a synthesis report will be available from Jisc in the near future.

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Take part in the ARIADNE Stakeholder Survey and win an iPad

ADS and the ARIADNE project consortium kindly ask you to participate in an online-survey about data access in archaeological research. With your support, we will be able to bring archaeological information systems a step forward.

The survey is aimed at:

  • researchers in archaeology
  • directors of archaeological research institutes
  • managers of digital data repositories

The survey explores user requirements, current practices, and gaps with regard to the access to research data in archaeology. Answering the questionnaire will approximately take 20 minutes. The questionnaire is available at: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/1405631/ARIADNE-Stakeholder-Survey
The survey will run until 31st December 2013.

Participate and win an iPad: With a bit of luck, you can win one of two iPads (or other tablet computers – depending on the winner’s choice), which will be raffled off among all the survey respondents.

Feel free to forward this information to colleagues in your research institute who are also welcome to participate in the survey.

European Projects Update

It is a busy and exciting time for European research at the ADS! Within the last six months, we have started three new projects; each of which have important research trajectories in their own right, but the timing of many of the initiatives within these projects is proving particularly fortuitous. In addition, the 12-month, AHRC funded SENESCHAL project is already bearing fruit which will be of great use, and an important exemplar for Europe. All of these projects together, while daunting to organise, have created great momentum and discussion around a wide variety of research areas here at the ADS.

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ARIADNE Update

After the kick-off meeting in February in rainy but beautiful Rome, we have now begun work on Advanced Research Infrastructure for Archaeological Dataset Networking (ARIADNE). A four-year EU FP7 Infrastructures funded project, ARIADNE is coordinated by PIN at the University of Florence and ADS (Deputy Coordinators), and is made up of 24 partners across 16 European countries. ARIADNE has the ambitious goal of “bringing together and integrating existing archaeological research data infrastructures, so researchers can use the various distributed datasets and new and powerful technologies as an integral component of the archaeological research methodology”.

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