Category Archives: Data Reuse

Public Use and Interest of 3D Data in the ADS

https://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archives/view/forseadiscovery_2018/photogrammetry.cfm?pgsite=Bayo_Area1

Over the last decade, archaeological 3D data has become more accessible to the public. There are online archives, similar to the ADS, where users can access this data for additional knowledge in specific artifacts and archaeological sites which have been recorded using various forms of 3D data. While this data can be viewed, some online archives do not have their data open for the public to download and re-use for their own purposes.

3D Data in the ADS Archives Questionnaire: Link

This questionnaire has been created by Michaela Mauriello, a University of York Digital Heritage Masters student, to investigate the activity and re-use of 3D data found within the ADS archive. Specific archives provide photogrammetric, CT scans, laser scans and additional forms of data gathered while the project was in progress. The 3D data found within the ADS archives can be downloaded for personal re-use. This downloadable data and metadata can be used in projects and research by those interested in the particular subject.

The ADS utilizes an open sources 3D Viewer (3D Hop) allowing users to interact with 3D data found in archives providing photogrammetric data such as the ForSEAdiscovery. Two versions of the viewer were developed for the ADS and include: the Object Level 3D Viewer and the Stratigraphy 3D Viewer. The object 3D Viewer allows users to move the object to view all sides, zoom in and out of the scene as well as control the lighting in the viewer to see better details in specific areas of interest. The viewer for the stratigraphic data shows different layers found within the archaeological site. This can be seen in the Las Cuevas Project archive.

https://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archives/view/lascuevas_uchn_2016/viewer.cfm

With the availability of 3D data found in the ADS archives, it is important to be transparent as to how easily accessible it is to find the archived 3D data. Based on previous statistical analysis performed between October and November 2018, there was limited access to the 3D data found in the ADS archives. This may depend on the visibility of the archive as once depositors submit their work it generally conveys the project has been fully completed and have since moved on to their next research interest.

Additionally, there is no current tab to access an archive that contains 3D data. This stems from the issue of the inability to fully query for 3D data. While it may appear to be beneficial to incorporate a tab to the main ADS archives web page, the question arises if it is actually desired by users. The questionnaire monitors this aspect of desirability through questions about the awareness of 3D data being available to view and download in the ADS archives.

The outcome of this survey will help the ADS prioritize 3D data and how it will be represented in the website. If desired, in the long term the inclusion of an easily accessible method to view the 3D data can lead into more traffic for the archive while increasing the viewership, use and re-use of various projects.

Go To Questionnaire

ADS Goes Live on International Digital Preservation Day

On 30th November 2017 the first ever International Digital Preservation Day will draw together individuals and institutions from across the world to celebrate the collections preserved, the access maintained and the understanding fostered by preserving digital materials.

The aim of the day is to create greater awareness of digital preservation that will translate into a wider understanding which permeates all aspects of society – business, policy making and personal good practice.

To celebrate International Digital Preservation Day ADS staff members will be tweeting about what they are doing, as they do it, for one hour each before passing on to the next staff member. Each staff member will be focusing on a different aspect of our digital preservation work to give as wide an insight into our work as possible. So tune in live with the hashtags #ADSLive and #idpd17 on Twitter or follow our Facebook page for hourly updates. Here is a sneak preview of what to expect and when:

Continue reading ADS Goes Live on International Digital Preservation Day

Meet the #OAFund winner!

To mark the 2017 Open Access week, we thought it would be a good time to introduce the winner of our first Open Access Archaeology fund award (see our original announcement here), decided on after much deliberation and consideration by the panel of 3 independent judges. So…

Meet Chris

Figure 1: Chris with his geophysics equipment. Image credit: C. Whittaker

Continue reading Meet the #OAFund winner!

Built Legacy: Preserving the Results of Historic Building Investigations

Today we release the findings of our Built Legacy Project (see ADS blog April 2016). The full report can be downloaded here.

It’s long been known that the conservation and built heritage sector have not really engaged with OASIS, the ADS and digital archiving in general. We wanted to investigate why and what could be done about this.

The project aimed to:

  • Establish a state of the sub-sector snapshot of digital archiving practice/awareness
  • Survey practitioners we have not traditionally engaged with – IHBC, RTPI etc. facilities managers, local authority staff, etc.
  • Conduct outreach in terms of event attendance, video, leaflet and training workshop.

Continue reading Built Legacy: Preserving the Results of Historic Building Investigations

Built Legacy: Preserving Historic Buildings Data

By Angela Creswick

Responding to concern that there may be gaps in the recording of investigations and sustainable archiving of digital data and reports on standing buildings, the ADS has embarked on a five-month project funded by an External Engagement Award from the University of York to research current practice and user needs of conservation architects, surveyors, engineers and their specialist teams.
Continue reading Built Legacy: Preserving Historic Buildings Data

ADS a Recommended Repository for Nature Publishing Group

ADS are very pleased to announce that we are now an officially recommended repository for Nature Publishing Group’s open access data journal Scientific Data. ADS joins approximately 80 other data repositories, representing research data from across the entire scientific spectrum. ADS has been approved by Scientific Data as providing stable archiving and long-term preservation of archaeology data.

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Scientific Data offers a new article type, the ‘Data Descriptor’, which has been specifically designed to publish peer-reviewed research data in an accessible way, so as to facilitate its interpretation and reuse. Publishing Data Descriptors enables data produces and curators to gain appropriate credit for their work, whilst also promoting reproducible research.  The main goals of this journal are tightly aligned with that of ADS, focusing on making the data publicly accessible and encouraging re-use.

data descriptor

By becoming a recommended repository for Scientific Data, we are now not only a recommended repository for archaeological data accompanying articles published by the Nature Publishing group but researchers now have the opportunity to deposit archaeological data to ADS, whilst submitting an Data Descriptor to Scientific Data.

All depositors depositing with ADS and intending to publish in Scientific Data or another Nature Publishing Group journal must choose to disseminate the data they are depositing with us under a CC-BY liecence. For more information contact the ADS at help@archaeologydataservice.ac.uk

 

 

 

Rural Settlement of Roman Britain

Tim Evans

In June 2013 I wrote the first in what I planned to be a two part blog describing my work on the Rural Settlement of Roman Britain Project (henceforth RRS).  A little later than planned, here it is.

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Drawing of a columnar Roman milestone found c.1772 on the Fosse way two miles from Leicester, bearing the name Ratae (the unofficial logo for the project Web Mapping). Image from the Society of Antiquaries of London Catalogue of Drawings and Museum Objects doi:10.5284/1000409

Background

The RRS project arose from a two-stage  pilot project undertaken by Cotswold Archaeology and funded by English Heritage (now Historic England), Assessing The Research Potential of Grey Literature in the study of Roman England. This project identified the large levels of grey literature, the colloquial term for unpublished reports produced primarily through the planning process containing significant information about the Roman period.

The RRS project is being undertaken by the University of Reading and Cotswold Archaeology and funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust with additional backing from Historic England. The project has built on the pilot by reviewing all sources – traditional published journals/monographs and grey literature – for the excavated evidence for the rural settlement of Roman Britain with the over-arching aim to inform a comprehensive reassessment of the countryside of Roman Britain.
Continue reading Rural Settlement of Roman Britain

Digital Data Re-use Award 2015

Internet Archaeology and the Archaeology Data Service have teamed up to provide an Award that recognises the outstanding work being carried out through the re-use of digital data.

The Digital Data Re-use Award offers people the chance to promote their work and win the opportunity to publish, free of charge, in the premier open access journal Internet Archaeology.

This Award is intended to:
  • acknowledge the wide range of research carried out that re-uses data hosted at the ADS
  • raise awareness of the research potential of data re-use in archaeology and beyond
  • raise the winners profiles amongst peers
  • assist the winners career development

The top 3 entries will receive one of our coveted 1GB trowel-shaped USB sticks, a certificate of accomplishment, and will be invited to publish their case studies in the ADS blog SoundBytes.
Continue reading Digital Data Re-use Award 2015

Tell us your ORCID!

ADS and Internet Archaeology have been integrating ORCID iDs to archives and articles for a while now, and with over 1.3 million ORCID iDs issued we are sure some of our previous depositors and authors have now registered. By telling us your ORCID iD we can link to your ORCID record from our ADS archive pages and Internet Archaeology articles.

Tell us your ORCID iD by emailing help@archaeologydataservice.ac.uk

If you don’t already have an ORCID iD why not register today!

Read ADS Director Julian Richards reasons for registering for a ORCID ID here.
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What is ORCID?

ORCID provides a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes an individual from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submissions, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that all your work is recognized.

In other words, ORCID does for people what Datacite and Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) do for online resources.  It is supported by some major research organisations, libraries, and publishers, including the California Digital Library, CERN, Cornell University, Elsevier, MIT, Nature Publishing Group, Thomson Reuters, The Welcome Trust, and Wiley Blackwell.

 ORCID is a free service and it is surprisingly easy to register for an ORCID ID. Indeed, it takes about 30 seconds, and then it is equally easy to add information about publications and funded research projects. As soon as you have registered ORCID will use automated tools to make suggestions of publications and data sets drawn from the databases of CrossRef, Datacite, Europe PubMed CentralScopus and other services.

Then don’t forget to tell ADS by emailing help@archaeologydataservice.ac.uk so we can update your records!