Category Archives: Guides to Good Practice

Cartoon showing the way to a data repository.

Guidelines for Depositors, a reintroduction

The first half of 2020 has been an interesting one for sure. We’ve been working from home with our partners, children, and kettles as coworkers and we’ve begun to look at how information is presented on our website.

You may or may not have come to our site to find out guidance on depositing data. In that quest, you may have found a document/guide that was spread across several webpages, with no images, an over eager table of contents, and a reminder it was written in 2015. Well, you’ll be happy to know, that it’s gotten a bit of a face lift.

So without further ado, allow me to reintroduce yourself to our Guidelines for Depositors.

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OUT NOW: Dendrochronological Data in Archaeology

For a great deal of human history, wood has been an important construction material and remnants of ancient wood are preserved to this day in archaeological sites on land and under water, as well as in buildings and mobile heritage.

Old School Cottage, Bayton, Worcestershire: Section of joist with 132 rings (in a distance of 8 cm), 1378-1509 (Vernacular Architecture 27, p. 91).
Old School Cottage, Bayton, Worcestershire: Section of joist with 132 rings (in a distance of 8 cm), 1378-1509 (Vernacular Architecture 27, p. 91).

Dendrochronology is an important tool in cultural-heritage research  to determine the exact calendar age of ancient wood. Such age determinations contribute significantly to assessments of the meaning of archaeological and architectural structures in terms of their chronological and cultural context.
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Coming Soon: Dendrochronological Data in Archaeology Guide to Good Practice!

DCCD_HiResADS and the Digital Collaboratory for Cultural Dendrochronology are pleased to announce that a new Guide to Good Practice on Dendrochronological Data in Archaeology will be available soon.

The guide will ariadneprovide good-practice guidance for the collection and archive of dendrochronological data in the context of archaeological and historical research. The guide is aimed at both those creating dendrochronological datasets, and those that commission dendrochronological analyses. This guide will not cover the methods involved in dendrochronological analyses, but focuses on how to describe and archive the digital data and metadata involved in these analyses.

The guide will be available soon on the Guides to Good practice website, and it’s release will be announced on the ADS website, so keep a look out for the announcement.

Old School Cottage, Bayton, Worcestershire: Section of joist with 132 rings (in a distance of 8 cm), 1378-1509 (Vernacular Architecture 27, p. 91).
Old School Cottage, Bayton, Worcestershire: Section of joist with 132 rings (in a distance of 8 cm), 1378-1509 (Vernacular Architecture 27, p. 91).

Continue reading Coming Soon: Dendrochronological Data in Archaeology Guide to Good Practice!

Archaeological Drones

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are a ‘disruptive technology’, a technology that forces us to rethink how we do (or used to do) things – from protecting white rhino to delivering pizza. Everyone who needs a bird’s eye view is now wondering how this technology can help them; farmers, structural engineers, ecologists and, of course, archaeologists.

UAV-press02
Hexacopter equipped to take near-vertical photographs

In theory, even a very minor archaeological site can now benefit from its very own aerial survey. But while the possibilities for archaeology are immensely exciting, many of the actual results are still disappointing; blurry aerial photos, images which may be pretty but which can’t be georeferenced and expensive cameras hitting the ground at terminal velocity.

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