Williams, H. and Atkin, A. (2015). Virtually Dead: Digital Public Mortuary Archaeology. Internet Archaeology 40. Vol 40, https://doi.org/10.11141/ia.40.7.4.

Title
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Title:
Virtually Dead: Digital Public Mortuary Archaeology
Issue
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Issue:
Internet Archaeology 40
Series
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Series:
Internet Archaeology
Volume
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Volume:
40
Biblio Note
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Journal
Abstract
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Over recent decades, the ethics, politics and public engagements of mortuary archaeology have received sustained scrutiny, including how we handle, write about and display the archaeological dead. Yet the burgeoning use of digital media to engage different audiences in the archaeology of death and burial have so far escaped attention. This article explores categories and strategies by which digital media create virtual communities engaging with mortuary archaeology. Considering digital public mortuary archaeology (DPMA) as a distinctive theme linking archaeology, mortality and material culture, we discuss blogs, vlogs and Twitter as case studies to illustrate the variety of strategies by which digital media can promote, educate and engage public audiences with archaeological projects and research relating to death and the dead in the human past. The article then explores a selection of key critical concerns regarding how the digital dead are currently portrayed, identifying the need for further investigation and critical reflection on DPMA’s aims, objectives and aspired outcomes.
Author
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Author:
Howard Williams ORCID icon
Alison Atkin ORCID icon
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
2015
Locations
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Subjects / Periods:
Human Remains (FISH England)
BURIAL (Monument Type Scotland)
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ADS Library (ADS Library)
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DOI: https://doi.org/10.11141/ia.40.7.4
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Created Date:
28 Mar 2019