n.a., (1995). Brit Archaeol 5.

Title
Title
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Title:
Brit Archaeol 5
Series
Series
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Series:
British Archaeology
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
5
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DOI
DOI
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DOI
Publication Type
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Journal
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
1995
Note
Note
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Note:
Date Of Issue From: 1995
Source
Source
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Source:
The British Archaeological Bibliography (BAB)
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Created Date
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Created Date:
20 Jan 2002
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Abstract
Christopher C Dyer
8 - 9
Summarises the results of a recent survey of the forces which led to village formation in the East Midlands during the Middle Ages. Three distinct areas were identified within the region -- in which there were predominantly nucleated settlements, dispersed settlements, or a mixture of both types. The factors determining the form of the villages were found to be complex, with no clear link to either population pressure, feudal ties, or topography. An explanation based on a diversity of social, economic, and administrative causes is proposed.
Neil Burton
Expresses concern that the soon to be enacted Disability Discrimination Bill does not give exemption for buildings of historic importance and makes no reference to the constraints of listing and scheduling. PPG~15 is cited as giving pragmatic advice on this issue. There is a call for heritage to be adequately represented in future debate.
Reports evidence for large-scale exploitation of hazelnuts. It is thought that nuts were the staple foodstuff on the island, possibly due to a local absence of red deer and other game.
Brian Huntley
Contests the prevailing view that human activity -- especially spread of agriculture in the Neolithic -- was largely responsible for post-glacial vegetational change. It is argued that by refining our knowledge of the post-glacial climate we will see that the impact of humans on past environments has been over estimated and that natural climatic change is the prime mover.
A closely dated bone assemblage from the waterfront suggests that large-scale commercial food processing continued up to end of the Roman period in this, one of Britain's four fourth-century capital cities. Insect evidence also implies the presence of warm buildings, such as heated grain stores.
Reports the discovery of a massive late Roman church on Tower Hill, London -- which is similar to the fourth-century church of St Tecla, Milan -- and records that two metal detectorists have pleaded guilty to the charge of stealing the Salisbury hoard.
An extinct river valley running through East Anglia from the Midlands is thought to have offered an easy route for early humans entering Britain before the Anglian Ice Age (c 500,000 BP). There is an abundance of sites in this area, contrasting with an apparent lack of pre-Anglian occupation in the Thames valley.
Simon Denison