n.a. (1980). Archaeology in Essex to AD 1500. https://doi.org/10.5284/1081750. Cite this using datacite

Title
Title
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Title:
Archaeology in Essex to AD 1500
Series
Series
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Series:
Council for British Archaeology Research Reports
Volume
Volume
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Volume:
34
Downloads
Downloads
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Downloads:
cba_rr_034.pdf (8 MB) : Download
Licence Type
Licence Type
ADS, CC-BY 4.0 or CC-BY 4.0 NC.
Licence Type:
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ADS Terms of Use and Access
DOI
DOI
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DOI
https://doi.org/10.5284/1081750
Publication Type
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Monograph (in Series)
Abstract
Abstract
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Abstract:
An introductory paper by R H Allen and R G Sturdy (1-7) outlines the environmental background, geological history, and changes in vegetation and climate. J J Wymer (8-11) summarizes the main finds of Clactonian, Acheulian, and Levalloisian industries. The Upper Palaeo is not well represented; R Jacobi (12-13) considers isolated Late Glacial artefacts, and in a second paper (14-25) describes the Early Meso assemblages (particularly from Hillwood and White Colne) and major collections of Late Meso artefacts; non-microlithic equipment is illustrated as well as microliths. J D Hedges (26-39) collates information for Neo monuments and material culture, with a gazetteer of pottery-producing sites; there are several possible cursus monuments and small henges, and the Stour valley emerges as an important region during Late Neo. C R Couchman (40-6) offers a preliminary study of recorded evidence for BA settlement: EBA-MBA material had a riverine and coastal distribution, and LBA is additionally represented by metalwork concentrated around the Thames. P J Drury (47-54) surveys the Early and Middle Iron Age; hillfort occupation was largely replaced by oppida in late IA, and a trend from open to enclosed settlement occurred during the period, with a tendency to rectangular houses. A tentative framework for the development of IA ceramics is offered. C F Hawkes (55-8) identifies Caesar's 'maritime states' as the Trinovantes, seen as originating from Gaul (Ambiani) c 150 BC with appropriate equipment (chiefly swords, coins, and pottery). P J Drury and W Rodwell (59-75) discuss evidence for five aspects of Iron Age-RB settlement, arguing for landscape continuity between the two; military occupation, 'small towns', rural settlement, and the 'end' of Roman Essex are also treated. The development of Colchester from Roman times to the Norman conquest is discussed by P Crummy (76-81): he notes 5th-8th century occupation, a possible period of desertion 750-900, and reoccupation, first by Danes and finally by English in 0th century. M U Jones (82-6) reviews the Essex evidence for early Saxon rural settlement, and then concentrates on the evidence from Mucking of pottery, metalwork, and buildings. A catalogue of twenty-nine early Saxon cemeteries in Essex is provided by W T Jones (87-95). Mid-Saxon features at Wicken Bonhunt were excavated by K Wade; they represented a well-organised settlement of at least two phases with twenty-eight structures, using imported wares, and undergoing two later replannings (96-102). Certain features of the medieval landscape are surveyed by O Rackham, finding RB or even EIA origins and continuity of use from then on (103-7). C A Hewett (108-12) considers AS carpentry techniques, which displayed features and concepts which were archaic rather than crude; he lists Saxon/Saxo-Norman joints. A survey of twenty-four towns with urban status in the Middle Ages is given by M R Petchey (113-17), noting three phases of foundation - pre conquest, 12th century castle towns, and market-dominated towns of 1180-1260, many exhibiting evidence of deliberate planning. W Rodwell (118-22) discusses ecclesiastical sites and structures in Essex from Asperiodon, and K C Newton (123-5) evaluates the archaeological potential of four classes of archives. M C Wadhams (126-30) stresses the need for specialist knowledge and expertise in interpreting late vernacular architecture, and considers some specific recent research. D G
Issue Editor
Issue Editor
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Issue Editor:
David G Buckley
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
1980
ISBN
ISBN
International Standard Book Number
ISBN:
0 900312 83 1
Locations
Locations
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Locations:
Location - Auto Detected: Colchester
Location - Auto Detected: Essex
Location - Auto Detected: Wicken Bonhunt
Location - Auto Detected: Stour
Location - Auto Detected: Hillwood
Subjects / Periods
Subjects / Periods
Subjects / Periods associated with this record.
Subjects / Periods:
Middle Iron Age (Auto Detected Temporal)
Norman (Auto Detected Temporal)
Gaul Ambiani C 150 Bc (Auto Detected Temporal)
Medieval (Auto Detected Temporal)
Saxon (Auto Detected Temporal)
Roman (Auto Detected Temporal)
Ad 1500 (Auto Detected Temporal)
Pre Conquest 12th Century (Auto Detected Temporal)
Note
Note
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Note:
Date Of Issue From: 1980
Source
Source
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Source:
Source icon
BIAB (British Archaeological Abstracts (BAA))
Relations
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Relations:
URI: http://new.archaeologyuk.org/full-list-of-publications
Created Date
Created Date
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Created Date:
05 Dec 2008