L. M Thoms, ed., (2003). Tayside Fife Archaeol J 9. Perth: Tayside & Fife Archaeological Committee.

Title
Title
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Title:
Tayside Fife Archaeol J 9
Series
Series
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Series:
Tayside & Fife Archaeological Journal
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
9
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DOI
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DOI
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Journal
Editor
Editor
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Editor:
Lisbeth M Thoms
Publisher
Publisher
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Publisher:
Tayside & Fife Archaeological Committee
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
2003
Source
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Source:
The British & Irish Archaeological Bibliography (BIAB)
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Created Date
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Created Date:
29 Mar 2004
Article Title Sort Order Both Arrows Access Type Author / Editor Page
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Abstract
Lisbeth M Thoms
1
Michael Cressey
Alastair Roy Rees
Susan Dawson
3 - 5
Marine molluscs, shells and diatoms from a test pit near Inchture in the Carse of Gowrie have provided useful information about postglacial sea-level changes in the upper Firth of Tay. An uncalibrated age-range around 7000 BP was obtained on the shell. The dates confirm that later prehistoric settlement was probably confined to gravel areas along the 10-15m contour, while the floodplain below was probably not reclaimed until the medieval period.
Alex Hale
6 - 13
Survey of Ben Lawers has revealed much greater density of prehistoric rock carvings than previously known in upper Strath Tay, often on boundaries between different soil types. Their distribution in the rest of the Strath should be reconsidered, while their current distribution should be seen in relation to the processes that have affected their survival, movement and destruction.
Catherine McGill
14 - 33
A section of the palisaded enclosure including a single entrance, part of the central post-built structure, several ring-groove structures and numerous pits were investigated. Lack of stratigraphy prevented establishment of chronological relationships, but at least two principal phases were probably represented -- an unenclosed settlement of ring-groove houses and a subsequent palisaded homestead -- spanning the first millennia BC and AD. Trial sections were excavated through a souterrain and adjacent ring-groove houses outside the enclosure; a trumpet brooch was recovered from the souterrain. Includes
Fraser Hunter
25 - 26
Michael Church
26 - 28
Michael Cressey
28 - 29
Richard Strachan
Jamie E Hamilton
Andrew J Dunwell
34 - 64
Mains of Edzell was a triple-ditched enclosure originating before 400 cal BC, probably a settlement. Hawkhill was undated though perhaps also first millennium BC. The report considers such small multi-ditched enclosures in the pre-Roman Iron Age settlement landscape of lowland Angus. Includes
Catherine McGill
44
from Mains of Edzell
Graeme Warren
44
from Mains of Edzell
Michael Cressey
Michael Church
45 - 49
from Mains of Edzell
Michael Church
49 - 51
on Mains of Edzell
A Tams
51
from Mains of Edzell
Tim Neighbour
59
on Hawkhill
Catherine McGill
60
from Hawkhill
Graeme Warren
60
from Hawkhill
Kirsty Cameron
65 - 73
This souterrain excavated in the nineteenth century was partially re-examined, but no dating evidence was obtained. Graves noted earlier were presumed to lie outside the excavated area.
Simon Stronach
74 - 87
Results of small-scale excavation suggested that the South Street frontage was first divided into properties during the thirteenth century, when the street itself seems to have been a wide cobbled thoroughfare. Early development included construction of a high-status sandstone building at the front of one of the plots. During the fourteenth century this building was abandoned and midden accumulated within it. The whole area had been developed by the late eighteenth century. Includes
Derek W Hall
81 - 82
Adrian Cox
83 - 84
Nicholas M McQ Holmes
84
Catherine Smith
84 - 85
Mhairi Hastie
85
Derek W Hall
88 - 95
The medieval pottery retrieved from redevelopment of the Overgate in the 1960s is reassessed and discussed. Comment and analysis is also offered on three complete vessels from the Nethergate.
Graeme Brown
Jonathan Millar
96 - 102
Remains of three fragmentary human burials were identified in the churchyard, which was enclosed on several sides by a bank and ditch probably with a wall on the bank. Documentary research and a survey of the site has provided new evidence about the form of the church and established a more secure chronology for the use and abandonment of the building and its graveyard.
Iain Fraser
103 - 111
The late medieval sacrament house preserved in Cortachy parish church, Angus, is described and illustrated. It shows links with masons active at Melrose and Lincluden during the early fifteenth century and may have inspired two other sacrament houses in the Dundee area.
John R Sherriff
112 - 123
Survey of this derelict cottage provided evidence of its origins as an early eighteenth-century farmhouse, its role as a nineteenth-century cottage and its later use as a workshop, garage and bothy. Re-used architectural fragments indicated a pre-eighteenth century building nearby. Further work is planned.
Alex Darwood
Andrew M Sherriff
124 - 128
Apotropaic markings were carved onto a beam and spiritual middens (items such as a fabric doll) hidden below the floorboards of an old house in Anstruther; in each case they were intended to ward off evil spirits, especially witches.