AARGnews 28

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
AARGnews 28
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
AARGnews
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
28
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Editor
Editor
The editor of the publication or report
Editor:
Rog Palmer
Publisher
Publisher
The publisher of the publication or report
Publisher:
Aerial Archaeology Research Group
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2004
Source
Source
Where the record has come from or which dataset it was orginally included in.
Source:
Source icon
BIAB (The British & Irish Archaeological Bibliography (BIAB))
Relations
Relations
Other resources which are relevant to this publication or report
Relations:
URI: http://aarg.univie.ac.at/
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
21 Aug 2007

Please click on a Article link to go to the Article Details.
Article Title Sort Order no arrows Access Type Author / Editor Page
Start/End Sort Order up arrow
Abstract
Reference record only Rog Palmer
10 - 18
A look at the beginnings and early years of the Aerial Archaeology Research Group, and thoughts on its future, on the occasion of the twenty-first anniversary of its foundation; including
Abstract icon
Reference record only Paul Ashbee
13
No Abstract icon
Reference record only Paul Ashbee
14 - 15
ideas for a possible seminar, originally attached to Ashbee's letter to David Wilson dated 13 November 1980
Abstract icon
Reference record only Paul Ashbee
16 - 18
probably handed out at the first meeting of what was to become AARG, on 12 February 1981
Abstract icon
Reference record only Aerial Archaeology Research Group
19 - 23
With proposed changes for approval at the AGM in September 2004.
Abstract icon
Reference record only Eckhard Heller
40 - 43
The article discusses ways of creating enhanced spatial visualisations of features from aerial photographs using standard image processing tools or office components commonly available on most computers; types of presentation covered include relief maps; digital terrain models; and digital excavation profiles.
Abstract icon