White, P. (2001). The Impact of Potato Growing on Archaeological Sites. A Preliminary Study. Hereford: Herefordshire Archaeology. https://doi.org/10.5284/1048980. Cite this using datacite

Title
Title
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Title:
The Impact of Potato Growing on Archaeological Sites. A Preliminary Study
Series
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Series:
Herefordshire Archaeology unpublished report series
Downloads
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Downloads:
hereford2-324791_1.pdf (2 MB) : Download
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DOI
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DOI
https://doi.org/10.5284/1048980
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Report (in Series)
Abstract
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Abstract:
During October and November 2001, Herefordshire Archaeology undertook a preliminary study of the impact of the potato cultivation on archaeological sites within the county. The purpose of the study was to inform a national study on the management of archaeological sites within arable landscapes currently being undertaken by the Oxford Archaeological Unit on behalf of the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. The extent of potato farming within the county is revealed and the future impacts of potato cultivation in Herefordshire are also considered. Three sites were investigated at Sutton St. Michael, Cradley and Westhide form the basis of this report. The sites at Sutton and Cradley are defined as cropmark enclosures while Westhide is a small Romano-British settlement. All of the sites revealed damage from agricultural processes, with evidence of accelerated erosion of the buried archaeological deposits due to potato growing at Sutton and Cradley. The sites confirmed that various factors, such as slope, topographic location and crop regime would influence the occurrence of damage from arable farming on archaeological remains. The study concludes with an assessment of the impact of potato cultivation on archaeological sites with recommendations highlighting a series of various options that may be undertaken to manage archaeological sites in arable landscapes in the future.
Author
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Author:
P White
Publisher
Publisher
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Publisher:
Herefordshire Archaeology
Other Person/Org
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Other Person/Org:
Historic England (OASIS Reviewer)
Herefordshire HER (OASIS Reviewer)
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
2001
Locations
Locations
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Locations:
Site: Bury Hill, Cradley and Westhide
County: HEREFORDSHIRE
District: HEREFORDSHIRE
Parish: WESTHIDE
Country: England
Grid Reference: 352220, 246050 (Easting, Northing)
Grid Reference: 371400, 247870 (Easting, Northing)
Grid Reference: 357840, 244280 (Easting, Northing)
Subjects / Periods
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Subjects / Periods:
NONE (Find) None (GLL)
ENCLOSURE (Monus) Iron Age (GLL)
VILLA (Monus) Roman (GLL)
Identifiers
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Identifiers:
OASIS Id: hereford2-324791
OBIB: HAR 44
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Created Date
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Created Date:
13 Sep 2018
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