Issue: Two prehistoric short-cists and an early medieval long-cist cemetery with dug graves on Kingston Common, North Berwick, East Lothian

Publication Type
Abstract Human remains were discovered during the laying of a water pipe to service the refurbished Fenton Tower at Kingston, near North Berwick, in 2001. Two short-cist burials, thirty-eight long-cist burials and bank-defined terraces containing dug graves and a possible chapel (NT58SW 152) were found. It is suggested that three main periods of burial are represented, spanning the Neolithic to the early second millennium AD.
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Author Ian Suddaby
Issue Editor Helen Bleck
Publisher Society of Antiquaries of Scotland
Year of Publication 2009
Volume 34
ISBN 0 903903 65 3
Source DigitalBorn
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Abstract
1
2 - 4
This chapter presents background to the work and details of the site location.
Adam Jackson
Graeme Warren
Ann MacSween
John A Lawson
Paul R J Duffy
5 - 16
This chapter presents aims and methods, describes the setting and gives a brief history of the site. Archaeological description of the remains is followed by specialist reports on chipped stone, coarse stone, prehistoric, medieval and later pottery and human skeletal remains. Two radiocarbon dates were obtained.
Adam Jackson
12 - 13
Graeme Warren
14
John A Lawson
14 - 15
Ann MacSween
14
Paul R J Duffy
15 - 16
17 - 18
The evaluation has provide evidence for activity which, on artefactual grounds alone, spans six millennia, from the Neolithic to the 20th century. This long-term chronology can be refined to indicate two distinct phases of human burial on the knoll, firstly the short-cists and secondly the early medieval cemetery. Within the latter phase, three sub-phases were recognised, sandstone cists without lintels, volcanic stone cists with lintels and dug burials. There was no evidence of a hiatus within the sub-phases.
19
The fieldwork has re-inforced existing assumptions regarding the location, layout and dating of these cemeteries and that they often occupy burial sites of much greater antiquity.
20
21
22
Ian Suddaby
Human remains were discovered during the laying of a water pipe to service the refurbished Fenton Tower at Kingston, near North Berwick, in 2001. Two short-cist burials, thirty-eight long-cist burials and bank-defined terraces containing dug graves and a possible chapel (NT58SW 152) were found. It is suggested that three main periods of burial are represented, spanning the Neolithic to the early second millennium AD.