Series: Levant Supplementary Series

Council for British Research in the Levant
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ADS Collection DOI https://doi.org/10.5284/1034377
Primary Contact: Council for British Research in the Levant: email
Associated OrganisationCouncil for British Research in the Levant
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Issue Title Sort Order up arrow Access Type Publication
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  Author / Editor   Abstract Publication
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Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Joan R Clarke
No Abstract icon
2005
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Graeme Barker
D D Gilbertson
David Mattingly
No Abstract icon
2007
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Brian F Byrd
Andrew N Garrard
The natural arc of resource-rich land which forms the ‘Fertile Crescent’ of South-West Asia is widely regarded as the earliest centre of village-based farming in the world. It has been the focus of much research on the transition from Epipalaeolithic hunting and gathering to Neolithic farming. Beyond the Fertile Crescent is the first volume of the Azraq Basin Project, a large-scale archaeological and palaeoenvironmental survey and excavation project undertaken between 1982 and 1989 at the margins of this region, in the steppe and oasis environments of the Azraq Basin in north-central Jordan. This is a region rich in Palaeolithic and Neolithic sites. Beginning with an overview of the Project’s aims, a detailed analysis of past and present environments, and the history of survey and excavation in the Basin, Beyond the Fertile Crescent explores the geology, stratigraphy and dating of the Late Palaeolithic sites and provides a detailed description of the technology and typology of the chipped stone assemblages from the sites. These are then compared with those from the wider Levant, in order to explore possible links between technological traditions and social groups and to reconstruct settlement strategies across the region.
Abstract icon
2013
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon P Bienkowski
Katharina Galor
No Abstract icon
2006
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Julie Lovell
Y M Rowan
No Abstract icon
2011
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon E J Peltenburg
No Abstract icon
2007
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Bernard Knapp
Jay Noller
Luke Sollars
Vasiliki Kassianidou
Michael Given
The fieldwalkers and specialists of the Troodos Archaeological and Environmental Survey Project investigated a wide variety of physical and cultural landscapes on the northern edge of the Troodos Mountains in central Cyprus over six field seasons. These landscapes range from the cultivated Mesaoria Plain in the north to the forested Troodos Mountains in the south, and from the rich and fertile Karkotis Valley in the west to the drier and narrower Lagoudhera Valley in the east. Across this physical topography lie the cultural landscapes of food and fibre production, natural resource extraction, water conveyance and industry, ritual and burial, and the structures associated with villages, farms and copper mines. Our regional perspective and time span of at least 12,000 years mean that the research issues are inevitably wide-ranging. At the core is the complex and dynamic relationship between people and their landscape, as it was played out in resource extraction, communication, settlement, social organisation, and the manipulation of soils, plants and water. This conceptual focus opens out onto a wide range of case studies, both chronologically and thematically. Volume 1 of this publication contains a full explanation of the project’s research context, research philosophy and methodology, and detailed analyses of the archaeology, material culture, architecture and environmental record of the Survey Area as a whole. This is followed by a series of period-specific analyses (Prehistoric, Iron Age, Hellenistic–Roman and Byzantine–Modern), and a conclusion which addresses our primary research goals and offers an evaluation of the project.
Abstract icon
2013
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Bill Finlayson
Graeme Warren
No Abstract icon
2010
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon E J Peltenburg
Alexander Wasse
No Abstract icon
2004
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Bill Finlayson
Stephen Mithen
No Abstract icon
2007
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Alison V G Betts
Dawn Cropper
Louise Martin
Carole McCartney
The Jordanian badia north and east of the oasis of al-Azraq is an arid region divided into two distinct zones. In the west lies the black, boulder-strewn landscape of the harra; to the east the low rolling gravel plains of the hamad. Extreme climate has largely protected the region from modern development and has preserved a remarkably rich record of its prehistoric past. This is the second of two volumes to document extensive surveys and excavations in the region from Al-Azraq to the Iraqi border over the period 1979–1996. Broadly, it covers the Late Neolithic and Chalcolithic of the eastern badia, including surveys in the harra, excavations at a number of sites at Burqu’ and extensive surveys of sites of all periods in the eastern hamad. The rich prehistoric record preserved in the east Jordanian badia was first brought to the attention of western scholars through casual discoveries by RAF pilots flying along the old air route to Baghdad, and through surveys carried out by Henry Field in the period from 1925 to 1950. The region then remained unstudied until the 1970s, when Garrard and Stanley-Price undertook further survey work in the Azraq Oasis. This was followed by the surveys and excavations documented in this series.Over time an outline prehistory of the region has emerged. Late Epi-Palaeolithic camp sites have been found in the north-west of the harra in the foothills of Jebel Druze, while the central basalt region sawa floruit of activity in the late Aceramic Neolithic, when it was used extensively for hunting. This volume covers the following period, which witnessed a further spread of campsites and short-term occupation out around the edges of the harra and across the hamad as far as the lands bordering the Euphrates to the north and east. This period was marked by the first appearance of sheep and goat as one element of the steppic economy alongside traditional practices of hunting and foraging. The concluding chapter discusses these changes and proposes models for the introduction of domesticated animals into the steppe as a precursor to a full nomadic pastoral economy.
Abstract icon
2012
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Andrew Petersen
No Abstract icon
2012
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon P Bienkowski
No Abstract icon
2011
 
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