Series: ADAS UK Ltd unpublished report series

ADAS UK Ltd
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Year of Publication (Start): 2015
Year of Publication (End): 2019
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Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon C Barley
In May and June 2019 ADAS carried out an archaeological watching brief for Kier Integrated Services and Clancy Docwra (KCD). These groundworks were for 13 geotechnical trial holes, to monitor ground conditions for a new sewerage scheme in advance of a new residential development south of Cirencester (NGR: SU 0243700212) The proposed works at Chesterton Farm lie within an area known for containing high concentrations of archaeological remains relating to Prehistoric and Roman activity, mostly in the form of cropmarks visible on aerial photographs. Although the trial pits were located within a rich archaeological area of potential no archaeological features or artefacts were identified during monitoring of the groundworks for the trial pits. The absence of archaeological features recorded during the archaeological monitoring of trial pits 1-13 may be attributed to the relatively limited impact of the groundworks. These results indicate that the monitoring methodology used was effective in ensuring that the development resulted in no harm to the historic environment resource.
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2019
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon J McNicoll-Norbury
Archaeological monitoring of groundworks as part of a planning condition. The site was located adjacent to Grim's Ditch however no evidence of the ditch or any other archaeological features were identified
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2018
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon C Cleaver
In July 2019, ADAS carried out an archaeological watching brief for Bristol Water plc. The groundworks were for the repair of the Cheddar to Brent Knoll water pipeline on land at Brent Knoll, to the south of Bristol, Somerset (NGR: ST 34718 50995) as shown on Figure 1. A total of seven investigative trenches were dug. A linear cut feature [1004] from Trench 1 may be associated with the large cut feature [904] previously identified during excavations in 2013 (Wessex Archaeology 2013b) shown in Figure 3a. The feature identified in 2013 [904], was interpreted as a large Romano-British ditch (ibid). It is considered that cut [1004] found in Trench 1 is a continuation of this feature. In addition, the sherd of Romano-British pottery recovered from the lowermost fill of this feature (1005) further supports this theory. The loom weight recovered from Trench 5 also supports the Romano-British activity understood to have taken place in this area. Although Trench 7 was located only approximately 9 m to the east of the previous Area 7 excavation carried out in 2013 (Figure 2b), no trace of feature [704] was observed within the trench. This suggests that feature [704] terminates between the Area 7 excavation and Trench 7. The absence of a larger number, or more significant archaeological features recorded during the archaeological monitoring of the seven investigative trenches may be attributed to the relatively limited impact of the groundworks. These results indicate that the monitoring methodology used was effective in ensuring that harm to the historic environment resource was mitigated or avoided.
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2019
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Andrew Brown
Archaeological monitoring of ground works for the connection of a clean water pipe to the existing water main at Southway House, Cirencester. A dark earth layer was recorded beneath modern service cuts which contained animal bone, Romano-British pottery and Post-medieval pottery fragments. This layer was interpreted as a garden soil.
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2018
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon J McNicoll-Norbury
The project comprised archaeological monitoring of a new cable trench through Ealing Common (an archaeological priority area) from The Common to A406. The monitoring did not reveal any archaeological deposits along the length of the cable route.
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2018
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon A Brown
In February 2019 ADAS carried out archaeological monitoring and recording of six geotechnical pits being excavated in advance of the construction of the new Ebbsfleet Primary Substation at Ebbsfleet, Kent (NGR: TQ 61447 73516). The aim of the archaeological monitoring was to demonstrate and prove that the proposed Site had been extensively quarried and back-filled in the recent past. The work was also carried out as a precautionary measure due to the discovery of significant archaeological and geoarchaeological remains during previous archaeological excavations to the north and south of the Site. No archaeological features, deposits or artefacts were observed during the archaeological monitoring carried out at the proposed site of the new Ebbsfleet Primary Substation. This was primarily due to the level of modern truncation from previous quarry activity carried out during the early and mid-20th century.
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2019
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon A Brown
Archaeological monitoring of ground works for the installation of new 11kV underground electricity cables and switch gear on Edwards Lane and Lordship Terrace in Stoke Newington, London. The monitoring reveled that the area had been severely truncated by previous services. No archaeological remains related to the former Medieval Manor of Stoke Newington were observed during the trench works.
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2018
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon J McNicoll-Norbury
Archaeological monitoring of overhead line Pole replacement between Cowes and Thorness on the Isle of Wight was carried out over a two month period. A Palaeochannel was recorded at the location of Pole 28. No further archaeological finds or deposits were recorded during the monitoring work.
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2017
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon S Dalby
Archaeological Monitoring of a 440V and 11kV 360m cable route on land at Floodgates Farm, Knepp Castle Estate, Horsham, West Sussex. No archaeological remains were found.
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2018
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon A Brown
In December 2017 ADAS carried out an archaeological watching brief for Torus 62 Development Company Ltd of groundworks for geotechnical trial Pits on land bounded by Corporation Street, Pocket Nook Street, and Atlas Street (centred on NGR: SJ 5187 9551). The available evidence suggested that the near surface remains are relatively late 19th components of St. Helens' industrial landscape. It is considered highly likely that deeper buried remains relating to the 18th century industrial landscape of St Helens are sealed below these higher deposits and have the potential to be well preserved. It is recommended that further archaeological strip map and sample excavation be undertaken on the northern part of the Site prior to any further development. This is primarily due to the presence of shallower, near surface structural remains possibly relating to the former Pocket Nook Smelting Works in that part of the Site.
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2018
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon A Brown
Archaeological monitoring and recording of permitted development works in an area known to contain a World War Two air raid shelter
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2017
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon S Dalby
Archaeological monitoring of ground investigation test pits
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2019
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon J McNicoll-Norbury
Archaeological monitoring and recording of nine trial holes to locate a 132kv underground electricity cable prior to diversion works. No archaeological deposits were identified on the site.
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2017
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon A Brown
In 2019 ADAS carried out archaeological monitoring of groundworks for the installation of a new 11kV underground electricity cable through the historic Mote Park in Maidstone, Kent. The most significant remains observed within the cable trench were the remains of two possible wall foundations (1024 and 1025) was recorded at the base of the north facing slope where the Route levelled out leading north-west towards the existing public footpath. It is considered that these walls may represent the remains of a building shown in a drawing of Mote Park by Johannes Kip in 1719 (Swaen.com 2019). The building in question was located to the east of Old Mote House (to the left of Old Mote House in the 1719 drawing). Evidence of localised quarry activity ([1015], [1018] and [1021]) was observed in the southern part of the Route on the north facing slope and evidence of landscaping and demolition was also observed there (1003, 1006, 1010, 1017, 1019, 1027, 1028, and 1029). No archaeological remains were observed in the northern part of the scheme. The observed stratigraphy suggests there was been extensive recent landscaping at the part of the Route. The observed finds from this part of the Route indicate that this landscaping has been carried out in the last 50 years. The lack of significant archaeological features recorded during the archaeological monitoring may be attributed to the relatively limited ground impact of the cable trench and due to the impact of previous quarrying, landscaping and demolition activity within Mote Park.
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2019
Reference record only icon Publication Type icon J McNicoll-Norbury
Archaeological monitoring and recording was carried out on ground works for the installation of a new high voltage underground electricity cable at Poynings House, Poynings, Brighton, West Sussex. A deposit associated with a rubble dump was identified in the cable trench.
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2017
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon A Brown
On 10th April 2019 ADAS carried out archaeological monitoring and recording for Kier Integrated Services and Clancy Docwra (KCD) of groundworks for repair and maintenance to an existing boundary box located on Green Street, Avebury, Wiltshire (NGR: SU 10375 70008). The site is located within the Avebury Henge and Stone Circle Scheduled Monument and it was considered that the groundworks had the potential to impact of significant buried archaeological remains. No archaeological features, deposits or artefacts were observed during the archaeological monitoring. The absence of archaeological features recorded during the archaeological monitoring of Trench 1 may be attributed to the relatively limited ground impact of the groundworks and due to the impact of previous development, specifically the construction and installation of the existing water main. These results indicate that the monitoring methodology used was effective in ensuring that the development resulted in no harm to the historic environment resource.
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2019
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon A Brown
On 10th April 2019 ADAS carried out archaeological monitoring and recording for Kier Integrated Services and Clancy Docwra (KCD) of groundworks for repair a leaking water pipe located on High Street, Avebury, Wiltshire (NGR: SU 09951 69878) as shown on Figures 1-3. The works were undertaken within the Stonehenge, Avebury and associated Sites World Heritage Site. Initial consultation between the Client and Miss Rachel Foster, the local authority archaeologist for Wiltshire Archaeological Service indicated that the development may have the potential to impact upon unknown buried archaeological remains within the development area associated with the remains of the nearby Avebury Henge and Stone Circle Scheduled Monument (HE No. 1015546) located approximately 46 m to the east of the proposed works. It was recommended that archaeological monitoring should be carried out during the groundworks in order to identify, assess and record any unknown archaeological remains. No archaeological features, deposits or artefacts were observed during the archaeological monitoring. The absence of archaeological features recorded during the archaeological monitoring of Trench 1 can be attributed to the relatively limited ground impact of the groundworks, the location of the works within the existing carriageway and due to the impact of previous development, specifically the construction and installation of the existing water main. These results indicate that the monitoring methodology used was effective in ensuring that the development resulted in no harm to the historic environment resource.
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2019
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon D O Seaneachain
In July 2018 ADAS carried out archaeological monitoring and recording of groundworks for repair and maintenance to an existing clean water main in an open agricultural field north of East Kennet near Avebury, Wiltshire (NGR: SU 11618, 67773). Since the site is located on National Trust land within the Avebury and Stonehenge World Heritage it was considered that the groundworks had the potential to impact of significant buried archaeological remains. No archaeological features, deposits or artefacts were observed during the archaeological monitoring. The absence of archaeological features recorded during the archaeological monitoring of Trench 1 may be attributed to the relatively limited ground impact of the groundworks and due to the impact of previous development, specifically the construction and installation of the existing water main.
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2018
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon Andrew Brown
Archaeological monitoring and recording of ground works during repair and maintenance works on an existing stop tap at 34 Burge Court and the replacement of inspection plates over water meters at Hanover Court. Although both locations were within the Corinium Roman Town Scheduled Monument, no archaeological features or artefacts were observed.
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2018
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon D O Seaneachain
In September 2014 ADAS UK Ltd carried out an archaeological watching brief for SSE Power Distribution during groundworks associated with the development of a new 132kV cable between Swindon substation and Stratton substation, Wiltshire. The objective of the watching brief was to identify and record all archaeological remains exposed during the development. No features or deposits of archaeological interest were observed during the groundworks, and no artefactural material pre-dating the modern period was recovered.
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2015
 
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