Series: Headland Archaeology Ltd unpublished report series

Headland Archaeology Ltd
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Primary Contact: Mike Middleton
Associated OrganisationHeadland Archaeology Ltd
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Year of Publication (Start): 1997
Year of Publication (End): 2020
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Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon D Doyle
S Mayes
Archaeological Watching Brief for E-on Central Networks, cable replacement
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2011
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon D Wilson
Headland Archaeology (UK) Ltd was commissioned to undertake an archaeological watching brief during the construction of an extension to the rear of 10 Bowyett, Torphichen, West Lothian. The site was located north of the 12th century Torphichen Perceptory. A single L-shaped foundation trench was excavated to the rear of the property to a maximum depth of 0.7m. This exposed several layers of modern made ground. No archaeological features or deposits were identified and the geological subsoil was not reached.
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2019
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon S Cox
Headland Archaeology was commissioned to undertake an archaeological watching brief on ground-breaking works associated with the residential development at 11-15 Gauze Street, Paisley. Sub-surface remains associated with a previous structure of late nineteenth century date were observed. It was apparent that the site had been truncated to the level of geological subsoil and levelled with modern deposits. This took place as a result of initial construction of the buildings and subsequent development on the site.
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2015
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon D Wilson
Headland Archaeology Ltd was commissioned by SPIE-ENS to undertake a programme of archaeological monitoring in connection with the replacement of powerlines in and around Ormiston and Cousland, near Tranent, East Lothian. The replacement of 22 poles across 5 separate areas were monitored during this programme of archaeological works. One of the poles was located within the limits of a scheduled ancient monument. The remaining poles were situated close to known historical assets. In all cases no features or artefacts of archaeological significance were identified.
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2017
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon P Masser
Following excavation of trenches by contractors within the garden adjacent to 124 Whitehouse road, Cramond, a site inspection was carried out in response to a request from the City of Edinburgh Archaeologist. No archaeological features were seen in the sections of the trenches.
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2011
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon J Van Wessel
Historic building recording and watching brief.
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2010
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon J W T McMeekin
A programme of archaeological works comprising an evaluation was undertaken in advance of a proposed development at 138 Elliot Street, Glasgow. The western part of the site had previously been evaluated and shown to contain structural remains relating to the Verreville Pottery. The eastern part lay outside the mapped extent of the pottery in the 19th century. To test the archaeological potential of the eastern part of the site six test pits were excavated. The results confirmed the presence of modern overburden up to 3m thick. A lens of material containing ceramics and kiln furniture was identified 2.3m below the modern ground surface in one test pit. The pottery formed part of a more general accumulation of dumped 19th material and did not form part of a well stratified or substantial area of dumping. The 19th century deposits lay directly over the naturally deposited sands and alluvial gravels.
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2008
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon S Mayes
Headland Archaeology was commissioned by Jamieson Associates Architects to undertake a programme of archaeological ground monitoring at 14-15 High Town , Hereford, following the submission of a planning application (P141379/F), to Herefordshire Council for proposed external alterations at 14/15 High Town (Grade II listed 1196841).
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2015
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon J Wessle
Headland Archaeology was commissioned to undertake a desk-based assessment at 157-159 South Street, St Andrews to support a planning application for the proposed redevelopment of existing buildings and adjacent vacant ground. The site lies within the medieval core of the town and is designated as part of the St Andrews Conservation area and as an Archaeological Area of Regional Importance. The existing buildings date from 1972 and do not themselves hold any great archaeological significance; however there is potential for intact remains of 19th century or earlier date to survive below the present floor level. The land to the rear appears to have lain relatively undisturbed since at least the late 16th century and there is considerable potential for intact remains of medieval and post-medieval date.
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2012
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon T Cochrane
I Bennett
Headland Archaeology undertook a programme of historic building recording at 16-18 High Town, Hereford. This was in response to a fire that took place on the site in October 2010 and the resulting planning application to develop the land. The structure originated as two 16th century timber framed buildings that have been through multiple uses, including as a public house, before becoming retail units in the 19th century. The later stages of the 19th century and majority of the 20th century saw rapid and extreme changes to the construction and layout of the buildings with most of the original structure lost. A Level 3 survey was undertaken for the historic core of the building and a Level 2 survey for the outbuilding and other more recent additions. The survey enabled a greater understanding of the development of the site, despite damage caused by the fire and considerable alterations made to the buildings.
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2018
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon S Thomson
Headland Archaeology undertook an archaeological excavation in advance of residential and commercial development of a site located at High Town and East Street, Hereford. The investigation revealed partial remains of three phases of stone foundations of medieval structures and surfaces, refuse and cess pits and deposits potentially associated with the former Saxon period town ramparts. Post-medieval and later structural remains were identified, including two wells. Evidence of iron working and probable textile processing in the vicinity during the medieval period was found together with a small pottery assemblage dating from the 12th to 16th centuries.
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2019
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon T Cochrane
Headland Archaeology (UK) Ltd undertook an archaeological watching brief within the basement of 16-18 High Town, Hereford, as part of renovation work being carried out on the building. The fieldwork revealed several features of post-medieval date, which seemed to relate to construction and subsequent alterations to the buildings. No features of other dates were identified.
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2018
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon S Thomson
Two trench evaluation in proximity to Saxon town defences identified post-medieval structural remains re-using possible medieval wall foundation, post-medieval and Victorian mettled surfaces
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2016
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon D Wilson
Headland Archaeology was commissioned to undertake a programme of archaeological recording of test pits prior to the construction of an extension to the rear of 18 The Scores, St Andrews, Fife. The Site was within the medieval core of St Andrews and the upstanding property dates to the late 19th century. Three test pits were excavated although only two were excavated to the maximum required depth of 1m. The third test pit was abandoned at 0.6m due to tree roots. Similar material was recorded in all three test pits with three distinct layers of silty sand in the two fully excavated test pits and two layers in the third test pit. The three layers likely represent agricultural activity in the area prior to its 19th century development. No archaeological features were identified although a small assemblage of medieval pottery was recovered.
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2019
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon C G Henderson
J V Wessel
An archaeological evaluation of the 18th century military road at Loch Arklet was carried out between 2nd and 4th August 2011. The evaluation targeted the intersection of the military road and an earlier pre-1718 road in order to record their relationship. A culvert forming part of the road was also investigated. The evaluation established that the 18th century military road straightened and improved earlier phases of road construction with well constructed culverts built to cross the numerous streams feeding Loch Arklet. No finds or earlier features were identified during the evaluation.
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2011
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon C Henderson
D McNichol
Headland Archaeology Ltd undertook an evaluation on the site of a proposed student accommodation development at 200 Dumbarton Road, Glasgow, in order to test the archaeological potential of the area. The work was commissioned by Watkin Jones Construction and a specification for the work was agreed with West of Scotland Archaeology Service (WoSAS). The site is adjacent to the River Kelvin and both mill buildings and lades are shown in the vicinity on Roy's mid-18th century survey. Four test pits were excavated across the development area. The test pits revealed a former ground surface (topsoil) at a depth of between 8.15 and 7.76m AOD across the site. This contained fragments of late 18th century clay pipe, and a concentration of pantile roof tiles, which most likely represented demolition debris from a nearby building. This layer was sealed by up to 2.5m of modern overburden which made investigating a representative sample of the former ground surface impractical. Therefore further work, a watching brief, was required during main contract bulk excavations. The watching brief was undertaken during groundworks below 8.4m AOD to enable further archaeological examination of the former ground surface uncovered during test pitting. The foundations of a building built at some point between 1858 and 1894 were uncovered during this phase. There was no evidence for any unmapped structures or earlier activity.
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2012
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon D Wilkinson
A programme of archaeological monitoring was carried out in order to satisfy a condition of the planning consent for the construction of an extension to the existing sales building of the BP Petrol Station at 23 Cannonmills, Edinburgh. The programme of works comprised the monitoring of ground works associated with the construction of the extension. This required the excavation of a small area to the south side of the existing building, measuring approximately11m x 6m, to the depth of the formation level at approximately 0.75m below the existing level of the forecourt. The removal of the overlying concrete slab revealed a number of modern services cutting a layer of undifferentiated made ground. The geological clay subsoil was only revealed in a small number of discreet areas. No features or artefacts of archaeological significance were recorded.
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2014
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon S Cox
Headland Archaeology was commissioned by Nash Partnership to undertake a programme of archaeological monitoring at 25 Castle Terrace, Berwick-upon-Tweed in order to fulfil a condition attached to a planning application (ref 14/00511/FUL). The site is located immediately west of a scheduled medieval church and graveyard at 21-23 Castle Terrace (ref 1019902). The development involved the demolition of the current dwelling and construction of a larger dwelling at the same location. The groundworks included the excavation of trenches varying between 0.95m and 1.7m depth for building foundations and associated services. Despite the archaeological potential of the site due its proximity to the scheduled monument and also the known medieval settlement of Bondington, no archaeological features were identified during the work. The groundworks revealed significant previous disturbance to the northern half of the site, particulaly levelling activity for the now demolished buildings. It is likely therefore that any archaeological remains would have been removed. In the gardens to the south, there was minimal evidence of disturbance and so the lack of archaeology suggests either none is present or that the development has avoided it.
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2015
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon D J Wilson
Headland Archaeology was commissioned by Nash Partnership to undertake an archaeological evaluation at 25 Castle Terrace, Berwick-upon-Tweed in support of a planning application. The site was located immediately west of a shedul;ed area. Three trenches were excavated totaling 27.5²m. The depth of the trenches varied between 0.7m and 0.9m below the present surface to a maximum depth of 47.7m OD. A single east-west aligned gully was recorded at the south end of Trench 1, close to the southern limit of the proposed development. The date and function of this feature was unidentified. No features relating to the scheduled medieval churhcyard were ideintified.
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2014
Download available from the ADS Publication Type icon M Dalland
A trial trench evaluation was carried out of 3-9 Duff Street as part of the planning condition for a re-development of the site. The old buildings had all been demolished and the ground levelled prior to the evaluation. The evaluation comprised 3 trial trenches totalling 100m in length. In the trench to the west a layer of undisturbed garden soil 0.5m to 0.9m deep was uncovered. The two trenches to the east comprised demolition deposits straight on top of natural sand and gravels. The eastern part of the site had been disturbed by the construction and demolition of buildings. However deepened garden soil developed when the area was used as allotments during the first half of the 19th century was found in the trench to the west. This indicates that the western end of the site remained largely untouched by the late 19th century industrial development in this area. One shallow cut was uncovered in the trench to the west, probably linked to the 19th century horticultural activity in the area. M Dalland 2013.
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2013
 
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