Series: Pre-Construct Archaeology Ltd (London) unpublished report series

Pre-Construct Archaeology Ltd
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Year of Publication (Start): 1994
Year of Publication (End): 2018
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M Slater
This report describes the results of an archaeological evaluation carried out by Pre-Construct Archaeology on land at the Fire Engine Hardstanding, Ely Cathedral, Cambridgeshire (NGR TL 54144 80228) between the 23rd to 27th January 2017. The archaeological work was commissioned by Ely Cathedral in response to an archaeological brief written by Roland Harris, Cathedral Archaeologist. The aim of the work was to provide information on the impact that replacement hardstanding would have on any archaeological deposits, namely burials. The principal result of the evaluation was one inhumation burial, a pit and several layers predating the demolition of the monastery, a clunch rubble leveling layer possibly related to the dissolution of the monastery, and numerous post-medieval layers reflecting periods of build up, rubbish spreading and construction or repairs to the cathedral. The later medieval burial indicates that the presumed location of the monks' cemetery on the south side of the cathedral may be correct. Of particular interest is the large quantity of residual early Roman and early to late Saxon pottery, which indicates the potential for surviving deposits from these periods in this area of the cathedral precinct.
2017
J Proctor
G Glover
A desk-based assessment and field evaluation were commissioned by Cundall Johnston and Partners as part of a planning application for the proposed development of a playing field on the site. The site lies immediately east of the route of a Roman Road. It also includes the site of Sheriff Hill Colliery, which began operating in the 1780s. The assessment judged that the potential for prehistoric remains on the site was low to moderate, the potential for Roman remains on the site was moderate to high, the potential for Saxon or medieval remains was low and the potential for post-medieval remains was high. It concluded that a further stage of archaeological investigation would be necessary to determine the extent, nature, date and degree of preservation of any archaeological remains on the study site. The evaluation consisted of 6 trenches, No significant archaeological features were encountered within the trenches investigated, the evidence from each trench consistent with the site being heavily landscaped in recent times.
2004
M Edmonds
An archaeological watching brief was undertaken during ground reduction at 1 Bank Street on the Isle of Dogs, London Borough of Tower Hamlets, E14 4JP. The area monitored during this watching brief observed bulk ground reduction for the construction of a basement to the west and north of West India Dock South. Natural drift geology was encountered during the watching brief at a high point of -0.52m OD for the upper sands and -2.00m OD on the underlying gravels. The watching brief revealed a sequence of modern and post medieval made ground that sealed alluvial clays that lay above the natural sand and gravels with no significant archaeological features or deposits noted.
2016
E Bates
During the watching brief a layer of natural Taplow Gravel was revealed between 45.46m and 45.60m OD which is part of the terrace system of the River Wandle. The natural was sealed by a layer of post-medieval ploughsoil. Next in sequence was a process of ground-raising which supported several 19th century structures, which included a boundary wall with associated brick floor and a further brick and chalk boundary wall with an associated flint yard surface. A brick soakaway and fireplace were also found. These features are correlated to structures which can be seen on 19th century historical maps of the area. The flint yard had been resurfaced with a gravel layer which is thought to have been either late 19th or early 20th century in date. A storage building was constructed in the 20th century, which contained a basement which had completely truncated the archaeological sequence within the southwest area of the site. Part of a boundary wall and a paved surface thought to be associated with this phase of construction were also seen.
2012
M-A Slater
This report documents the results of an archaeological evaluation of land at Latimer Close, Cambridge. A total of 50m of linear trial trenches were machine excavated, revealing a nineteenth century yard surface, possibly relating to the late nineteenth century Elfleda Farm, located immediately west of the site.
2013
B Ferguson
The potential for survival of ancient ground surfaces (horizontal archaeological stratification) on site was not present as natural showed evidence of been severely truncated. The surviving natural consisted of firm brownish orange clay with frequent small rounded and angular flints were encountered in the centre of the site and to the eastern side of the development site. The natural horizon within the western area of the development comprised of loose brownish orange sandy gravel. These natural clays and gravels were interpreted as the overlaying Quaternary sands and gravels of the Hackney Gravel Terrace as defined by Soil Survey of England and Wales (1983 and the British Geological Survey (1979). The evaluation also produced a partially exposed southwest corner of a 19th century cellar to former terraced houses that once fronted the north side of Lamb Lane. The height of these structural remains stands at a height of 16.45m OD. A thick layer of demolition rubble backfilled the cellar to a height of 16.66m OD, with mixed soil deposits directly overlaying the natural were recorded at a height of 17.19m OD and 16.81m OD. All three trenches clearly showed the underlying natural has been truncated down to between 15.25m OD (east of the site), 15.27m OD (west of the site) with the highest point at 15.49m OD in the centre of the site.
2015
I Cipin
An archaeological watching brief during development groundworks in and around the former graving dock structure. No archaeological features or remains pre-dating the 19th century were observed. A sequence of post-medieval ground reclamation and consolidation was observed cut by the construction trench for the northerly extension of the graving dock in the late 19th century. Associated with the dock extension were found the remains of sleepers and concrete supporting the rails of a travelling crane which was in place by at least 1934. Within the northern end of the dock was found the remains of a staircase by which the dock was accessed. Evidence was also seen for the in-filling of the dock in in the 1980s. The watching brief did not expose any remains of the original graving dock structure, built in 1876-8.
2015
P Jorgenson
Three geotechnical test pits were archaeologically monitored by PCA at 1 Penrhyn Road. The work was commissioned in order to inform the production of a Desk Based Assessment hence there is no site code/archive. Natural gravel was observed which was overlain by alluvium. The alluvium was sealed by made ground. No archaeological features were observed.
2013
C Mayo
A Turner
Two trenches were investigated during Phase 1 in the northeastern corner of the site, whilst three trenches were undertaken during Phase 2 in the southern and western area. The evaluation revealed natural terrace gravels across the site, cut by widespread but small-scale quarrying of the natural gravel in the 17th and 18th centuries. This activity must have been taking place within St. Georges Fields in which the site was located. Evidence for buried soil horizons above the pitting was seen in Trenches 1 to 4. The latter also showed an alluvial deposit which may represent a localised, undated flooding episode. Thereafter was found evidence for the urban development of the site which can be seen on historic maps by the 1790s and continuing through the 19th century. The evidence took the form of deep wells which would have served these properties; however no evidence was found for the structures themselves, and it is suspected that they have been truncated and demolished by redevelopment of the site through the 20th century. The finds assemblages recovered, particularly the pottery, are of interest and have significance at a local level.
2015
R Banens
This report details the results and working methods of an archaeological evaluation that was undertaken at 1-4 Capital Interchange Way, Brentford, London Borough of Hounslow, TW8 0EX (TQ 1907 7842).The evaluation demonstrated that the underlying superficial geology consisted of brickearth sealing terrace gravels. The brickearth sloped down from north to south, towards the River Thames, and was mottled green-grey in Trench 1. These areas of discolouration are likely the result of weathering. The remaining stratigraphy of the site was mainly composed of two post-medieval layers, with cut features. The earliest dated features were recorded in Trench 4, and dated from the early to mid-18th century. The features comprised a shallow linear feature running north-west to south-east, possibly the base of a ditch or gully following the path seen on the historic map regression, and associated post holes. An agricultural horizon dating to the late 18th-19th century spanned the site, and was only truncated by other small post-medieval features of a similar time period. This in turn was sealed by a darker horticultural layer of the mid-19th century, also spanning the site, likely associated with the orchard present on site during the mid-late 1800s. A large pit with two fills was observed in Trenches 2 and 4, truncating the earlier post-medieval horizons and cutting deep into the natural brickearth and gravel. The size and shape of this feature suggests that it was a quarry pit, representing activity from the late 18-19th century. It is likely that the pit was excavated for the purpose of gravel extraction or to access the naturally occurring outcrops of brickearth in the area. The post-medieval layers were largely undisturbed by later development on the site. .
2016
Douglas Killock
The watching brief monitored successive phases of groundworks carried during the demolition and construction programme starting in January 2011 and terminating in September of the same year. The results of the watching brief confirmed that over the vast majority of the site modern basements had removed all of the archaeological deposits that may once have been present above the natural sands and gravels. In the extremely localised areas where this was not the case, the only soil horizons extant above the natural sands and gravels consisted of post-medieval levelling layers that dated to the 18th or 19th centuries.
2012
I Bright
An archaeological investigation was undertaken by Pre-Construct Archaeology Limited at 1-8 Felgate Mews, Hammersmith, W6 0LY. The work was comprised of two evaluation trenches. Natural River Terrace Gravels were observed in both trenches, the OD heights suggesting that the natural strata declines towards north of the site, away from King Street. The presence of brickearth was observed in Trench 1 towards the north. Quarry pits dated to the 18th century were observed in Trench 2, to the south of the site, most likely for the purpose of brickearth extraction at a time when new buildings were being constructed in the area. The 19th century brick footings observed in Trench 2 appear to relate to the buildings that first appear on maps of the site during the mid 19th century, with the name mews suggesting their use as stables. The contents of the domestic rubbish pits to the north of the site suggest that the nearby inhabitants were of a comfortable socio-economic status. The change in nature of the site during the early-mid 20th century was accounted for by a number of substantial brick and concrete footings, services and manholes that relate to the 'food factory' which was established on site during this period. The extent of these structures caused severe truncation to earlier features and deposits where encountered and extended into the river terrace sands and gravels.
2013
M Edmonds
An archaeological watching brief was undertaken during ground reduction at 10 Bank Street on the Isle of Dogs, London Borough of Tower Hamlets, E14 4JP. The area monitored during this watching brief observed bulk ground reduction for the construction of a basement to the north of West India Dock South. Natural drift geology was encountered during the watching brief at a high point of -0.52m OD for the upper sands and -1.00m OD on the underlying gravels. The watching brief revealed a sequence of modern and post medieval made ground that sealed alluvial clays that lay above the natural sand and gravels with no significant archaeological features or deposits noted.
2016
A Turner
An archaeological watching brief was undertaken by Pre-Construct Archaeology Ltd within the basement of 10 Dover Street, City of Westminster, W1S 4LQ in advance of redevelopment. The investigation took place between 1st and 2nd of June 2015. Five engineering test pits were excavated in the basement of 10 Dover Street, to examine the foundations of the current building. The results of the archaeological watching brief indicated that the natural topography of the site, as represented by the naturally deposited river terrace gravels, had been significantly impacted by late post-medieval and modern activity.
2015
S Maher
An archaeological evaluation comprising 2 test pits was undertaken by Pre-Construct Archaeology LTD between 17th and 20th January 2017. Test Pit 1 measured 0.8m x 1.2m and had an excavated depth of 4.7m. Test Pit 2 measured 1.05m x 1.0m and had an excavated depth of 3.74m. Natural aluvial sands, silts, gravels and clays were seen at the bottom of the stratigraphic sequence. The first phase of human activity was Roman in nature and comprised layers of made ground. On top of these a section of a Roman clay and timber building comprising a clay floor slab truncated by a pattern of 6 stakeholes, was encountered in Test Pit 2. A medieval soil horizon was noted overlying the Roman deposits in Test Pit 2. A series of post-medieval deposits that pre-dated the 19th century were recorded in both Test pits. A N-S orientated 19th century wall was encountered in Test Pit 1. Deposits of 19th century demolition material and made ground sealed both test pits.
2016
J Kains
The site is to be used for the construction of a two bedroom detached house in the south garden of 109 Andover Road. A watching brief was carried out. In the majority of the site the chalk natural was exposed and revealed no archaeological resources. Potential may still exist on the eastern side of the site below levelling layers. However, this will not be impacted by the building works. In conclusion, no archaeological resources were observed and any that may exist are sufficiently protected from damage by the proposed building works.
2016
S Maher
An archaeological evaluation was undertaken by Pre-Construct Archaeology at 11 Rosslyn Hill, London Borough of Camden, NW3 5UL between 7th and 10th december 2015. Two evaluation trenches were excavated. The site is located within the Fitzjohn Netherhall Conservation area but not within an Archaeological priority zone. 11 Rosslyn Hill is itself a Grade II listed building dating from 1770. Excavations revealed natural clay deposits in both trenches to be overlain with post-medieval made ground. The most significant feature encountered during the investigations was a section of 17th century wall revealed in Trench 2. This was covered by 18th century demolition material. Remodelling works known to have taken place on site in the 1950's impacted heavily on Trench 1.
2015
N Hawkins
An Archaeological Watching Brief on geotechnical work recorded natural terrace gravels and small areas of naturally deposited alluvial clay. Cutting the natural gravels in one area were two phases of post-medieval channel dating from the late 16th century to the late 18th century. These channels had evidence of timber revetting along one side only. An undated linear was also recorded in a single evaluation trench excavated in the southern area of the site. Large areas of the site had been disturbed by 20th century intrusions relating to multiple phases of garage which were previously extant on site.
2010
S C L Harris
An archaeological watching brief was carried out intermittently between 25th April and 23rd May 2017. The investigation comprised the monitoring of excavation for the foundations and associated services of two new semi-detached domestic properties located within the former hand car wash forecourt. The watching brief revealed moderate modern impact on the buried deposits including foundation and service trenches present within the larger part of the site, with truncation identified to a maximum 1.60m below ground level (BGL). A layer of organic material over a layer of subsoil was found across the site, the remnant of the open land present before the construction of Kingscourt Road in the late 19th/early 20th century.
2017
P Jorgenson
An archaeological evaluation consisting of the excavation of two trenches was carried out within the footprint of the broposed building at 12 Park Road, Hackbridge, Surrey. The evaluation revealed that modern brick rubble directly sealed the natural gravel indication that the top of the gravel had been truncated during the construction of the present building occupying the site. No archaeological features, finds or deposits were observed.
2013
 
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