Roman Amphorae: a digital resource

University of Southampton, 2005 (updated 2014)

Data copyright © University of Southampton unless otherwise stated


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Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

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Sample Citation for this DOI

University of Southampton (2014) Roman Amphorae: a digital resource [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] (doi:10.5284/1028192)

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Tripolitanian 2



Distinctive Features

This amphora type was firstly identified by Panella (1973) and seems to be an amphora in the Punic tradition. It has a thickened everted rim with two superimposed steps ("a doppio gradino") and a short upright neck. There are two short, ear-shaped handles on the body below the shoulder and a long cylindrical body. The base is gently curved with a conical foot filled with a clay plug. The form is very occasionally stamped on the rim and handle.
See characteristics

Date Range

This form occurrs at Ostia from the second to the first half of the third century, though it is clear that it had a more localised distribution in north Africa during the first century AD and again in the 4th century AD (Panella, 1973).
Search: [1st century AD] [2nd century AD] [3rd century AD] [4th century AD]

Origin

This amphora was manufactured in Tripolitania (modern Libya), where several kiln sites are known (Panella, 1973; Arthur, 1982) at Gargaresh near Oea, Sidi as Sid and Ain Scersiara.
Search: [Libya] [North Africa]

Distribution

Mainly western Mediterranean, particularly Tripolitania, Tunisia and Italy (especially Ostia and Rome) (Panella 1973; Carandini & Panella 1981), although this form also occurs in the eastern Mediterranean (Zemer 1978). Main sites: Libya (Leptis Magna, Misurata), Tunisia (Pupput), Spain (Tarragona, Emp├║ries), south of France (Toulon), Italy (Ostia, Rome), Israel (Atlit).
Search: [Eastern Mediterranean] [France] [Italy] [Libya] [North Africa] [North West Europe] [Spain] [The Levant] [Tunisia] [Western Mediterranean]

Contents

Traditionally considered to be olive-oil (Panella, 1973; Keay, 1984) but the presence of pitch lining on the interior of this type now suggest another content: fish-sauce (Panella, 2001) or perhaps wine (Bonifay, 2004). The Pupput example held 82 litres.
Search: [Fish Sauce] [Wine]

Comments

Principal contributor: Michel Bonifay

Classification

Ostia 2

CEIPAC link

The following link will take you to the Centro para el Estudio de la Interdependencia Provincial en la Antiguedad Clásica CEIPAC database. In the CEIPAC system this amphora has the ID KE51+BYZ. Note: access to CEIPAC requires registration, which is possible via http://ceipac.ub.edu/corpus_reg.php?IDM=e