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Waterfront archaeology in Britain and Northern Europe

Gustav Milne and Brian Hobley (Editors)

CBA Research Report No 41 (1981)

ISBN 0 906780 08 X


Abstract

Title page of report 41

Almost any definition of a town must refer to the importance of trade, but archaeologists have only recently attempted to study the development of riparian and coastal towns by examining the major trade outlet itself, the waterfront. Such a study can provide graphic evidence of and suggest reasons for a town's origins, growth, or decline. In order to stimulate interest in waterfront archaeology by reviewing its potential, by assessing the current state of knowledge, and by improving the contact between urban and nautical archaeologists in Britain and on the Continent, a conference was held in London on 20-22 April 1979. It was jointly organized by the Museum of London, the Council for British Archaeology, and the Nautical Archaeology Trust.

Contents

  • Title pages
  • Contents (p iii)
  • Introduction (p v)
  • Acknowledgements (p v)
  • Part One: Waterfront archaeology in London
    • The London waterfront: the exception or the rule? by B Hobley (pp 1-9)
    • Early shipping and the waterfronts of London by P Marsden (pp 10-16)
    • Medieval boats, ships and landing places by S McGrail (pp 17-23)
    • Medieval waterfront buildings in the City of London by J A Schofield (pp 24-31)
    • Medieval riverfront reclamation in London by G Milne (pp 32-36)
    • The terms 'quay' and 'wharf' and the early medieval London waterfront by A G Dyson (pp 37-38)
    • What value dendrochronology to waterfront archaeology? by Jennifer Hillam and Ruth A Morgan (pp 39-46)
    • Southwark by M G Dennis (p 47)
    • Runnymede Bridge by S P Needham and D Longley (pp 48-50)
  • Part Two: The continental evidence
    • Ships and ports in Pomorze by P Smolarek (pp 51-60)
    • Wolin, Poland by W Filipowiak (pp 61-69)
    • The early Roman harbour in Velsen, Netherlands by J Morel and M D de Weerd (pp 70-71)
    • Dorestad: a Carolingian waterfront on the Rhine by W A Van Es and W J H Verwers (pp 72-76)
    • Dordecht: the late medieval waterfront at the Poortzijde by H Sarfatij (pp 77-79)
    • The medieval harbour at Bergen by A E Herteig (pp 80-87)
    • Post-Roman waterfront installations on the Rhine by D Ellmers (pp 88-95)
    • The medieval waterfront of Schleswig by D Eckstein (pp 96-102)
  • Part Three: The British and Irish evidence
    • Bristol by M W Ponsford (pp 103-104)
    • Chester by T J Strickland and S Ward (pp 105-107)
    • Dover by B J Philip (p 108)
    • Dublin's waterfront at Wood Quay: 900-1317 by P F Wallace (pp 109-118)
    • Exeter by C G Henderson (pp 119-122)
    • Gloucester by Carolyn M Heighway and A P Garrod (pp 123-124)
    • Harwich by S R Bassett (p 125)
    • Hull by B S Ayers (pp 126-129)
    • Ipswich by K J Wade (pp 130-131)
    • The medieval waterfront of King's Lynn by Helen Clarke (pp 132-135)
    • Kirkwall by N McGavin (pp 136-137)
    • Lincoln by M J Jones and R H Jones (p 138)
    • Norwich by A Carter (pp 139-141)
    • Oxford by B J Durham (pp 142-143)
    • Plymouth by J Barber and Cynthia Gaskill-Brown (p 144)
    • Poole by I P Horsey (pp 145-146)
    • Portsmouth by R Fox (pp 147-148)
    • York by P V Addyman (pp 149-150)
  • Bibliography (pp 151-154)
  • Index (pp 155-156)

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