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Prehistoric and Roman Archaeology of North-East Yorkshire

D A Spratt (editor)

CBA Research Report No 87 (1993)

ISBN 1 872414 28 1


Abstract

Title page of report 87

The book firstly draws together the available knowledge on the prehistoric and roman periods in North East Yorkshire and then constructs the most acceptable explanations for the human populations who adapted to and began to shape the landscape which we see today. The first two chapters present the geological and environmental background which is essential to a proper understanding of the period; the next five chapters discuss the region from the arrival of Middle Stone Age man through to the time of the Romans.

The present version has been updated to include the results of a further decade of research and discoveries and provides one of the most comprehensive source books available for the study of the early development of an upland landscape in England.

The North York Moors National Park, in association with the Council for British Archaeology, felt that such an outstanding contribution to the understanding of North-East Yorkshire (much of which was designated a National Park in 1952) should be more widely available and have therefore published this new edition. It will serve as an authoritative work for the region into the next century.

Contents

  • Title pages
    • Foreward (p ii) by Professor Philip Rahtz
    • Contents (pp iii-iv)
    • List of figures (pp iv-vi)
    • List of tables (pp vi-vii)
    • List of contributors (p vii)
    • Acknowledgements (p viii)
    • Summaries (p ix)
  • Introduction (pp 1-3)
  • 1. Geology and topography of North-East Yorkshire (p 4), by J E Hemingway
    • 1. Introduction (p 4)
    • 2. The Jurassic sequence (pp 4-6)
    • 3. Tertiary developments (p 6-9)
    • 4. Glacial influences (pp 9-10)
    • 5. Late-glacial and recent changes (pp 10-13)
    • 6. Geological potential of the region to early man (pp 13-14)
  • 2. Prehistoric environments (p 15), by I G Simmons, M Atherden, E W Cloutman, P R Cundill, J B Innes and R L Jones
    • 1. Introduction (pp 15-17)
    • 2. Late Devensian and Early Flandrian ecological history (pp 17-23)
    • 3. The mixed deciduous forest of Flandrian I and its occupants, 6650- 4750 bp (pp 24-33)
    • 4. The impact of Neolithic and Bronze Age cultures on the environment (pp 33-40)
    • 5. The Iron Age and Romano-British periods (pp 40-48)
    • 6. Coda (pp 48-50)
  • 3. The Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic periods (p 51)
    • 1. The Late Upper Palaeolithic period (10,000-7600 bc) (pp 51-52)
    • 2. The Early Mesolithic period (c. 7600-6600 bc) (pp 52-59)
    • 3. The Late Mesolithic period (6600-3500 bc) (pp 59-67)
  • 4. The Neolithic period (3500-1700 bc) (pp 68-75)
    • 1. The Early Neolithic period (3500-2500 bc) (pp 75-79)
    • 2. The Late Neolithic/earliest Bronze Age (2500-1700 bc) (pp 79-91)
  • 5. The Bronze Age (p 92)
    • 1. The Early Bronze Age (1700-1300 bc) (pp 92-120)
    • 2. The Late Bronze Age (1300-600 bc) (pp 120-141)
  • 6. The Iron Age (600 bc-AD 70) (pp 142-143)
    • 1. Querns (pp 143-146)
    • 2. Settlements (pp 146-154)
  • 7. The Roman period (AD 70-410) (p 155), with B R Hartley
    • 1. Civil settlement (pp 155-160)
    • 2. Military settlement (pp 160-166)
  • Concluding summary and research suggestions (pp 167-168)
  • Appendix 1 - Prehistoric trackways (p 169)
  • Bibliography (pp 170-179)
  • Index (pp 180-188), by Peter Rea

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