English Heritage Archaeological Monographs

English Heritage, 2014

Data copyright © English Heritage unless otherwise stated


Historic England logo

Primary contact

Louise Portsmouth
Historic England Publishing Department
Historic England
The Engine House
Firefly Avenue
Swindon
SN2 2EH

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1028203
Sample Citation for this DOI

English Heritage (2014) English Heritage Archaeological Monographs [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1028203

Mawgan Porth: A settlement of the late Saxon period on the north Cornish coast: Excavations 1949-52, 1954 and 1974

Bruce-Mitford, R.


English Heritage (1997)


Abstract:

Mawgan Porth: A settlement of the late Saxon period on the north Cornish coast: Excavations 1949-52, 1954 and 1974

Mawgan Porth lies c 55m from the sea on the northern slope of the Vale of Lanherne near the North Cornish coast and faces south on to the floodplain of the River Menalhyl. Excavations in 1950-52, 1954 and 1974 uncovered three distinct, but similar, groups of buildings known as courtyard houses and a cemetery, all containing evidence of a date of occupation between c AD 850 and 1050. Each courtyard group comprised a long main room along one side, with a partitioned end for livestock, several smaller rooms or walls around the remaining sides, and a narrow entrance. The living area of the main room included a hearth and various vertical slab features and wall cupboards. Traces of earlier buildings and occupational materials were found beneath the courtyard houses. The cemetery contained adult and child burials enclosed in slab graves. Pottery from the excavations forms a homogenous group with distinctive forms and fabric, partly inspired by the bar-lug tradition of Scilly and Cornwall with possible derivations from similar devices on contemporary Continental pottery. Other finds included simple stone tools made from local and regional materials, an abundance of perforated local slates, a few bone artefacts, iron traces, and a silver penny of Aethelred the Unready, struck between AD 990 and 995 (from a small room in Courtyard House 1). Associated animal bones indicate a domestic economy, supplemented by shell fishing. Abandonment, and possibly resettlement inland at St Mawgan, appears to have been caused by difficult sandy and windy seashore conditions.


Download monograph

Mawgan Porth: A settlement of the late Saxon period on the north Cornish coast: Excavations 1949-52, 1954 and 1974, Bruce-Mitford, R., English Heritage (1997), ISBN: 9781848021860 PDF 24 Mb